Your Key to Sports Success: INTJ Description

Your Key to Sports Success: INTJ Description

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This is a discussion on Your Key to Sports Success: INTJ Description within the INTJ Articles forums, part of the INTJ Forum - The Scientists category; This type description comes from Your Key to Sports Success (12th Edition, 2006) by Jonathan Niednagel. An updated edition is ...

  1. #1
    ISTP - The Mechanics

    Your Key to Sports Success: INTJ Description

    This type description comes from Your Key to Sports Success (12th Edition, 2006) by Jonathan Niednagel. An updated edition is expected to be released later this year, and if you would like to know more about Jonathan Niednagel's Brain Typing system you can purchase the book from his web site, BrainTypes.com - Understanding for the new millenium.

    BCIL / INTJ "Inventor"
    applicator of ideas; builder of theoretical systems; self-confident; independent, reserved, single-minded, conceptual; seeks knowledge; not impressed with authority; determined, analytic, stubborn, skeptical, scientific; logical abstraction skilled.


    INTJs are one of the rarest birds in the U.S. population, estimated at 2 percent. They make their presence known by inventing, researching, writing, practicing medicine, and doing a variety of highly skilled pursuits well. Though Introverted, they can develop facility for teaching and speaking, working well with language. As for foreign languages, an INTJ has linguistic capabilities that few can duplicate. (Naturally, they are left-brained dominant iNtuitives.) One INTJ learned fifteen foreign dialects quickly and easily as he set out for the mission field.
    INTJs are exceptionally independent. They appear cold and aloof unless they purposely develop a warmer method of relating. They may appear arrogant and “know it all,” even argumentative. This characteristic may alienate others who are intimidated by the “superiority” of the INTJ.
    With skill and confidence, INTJs enter areas of work and interest that require creating, constructing, and applying technology to complex problems. They like to be originals, coming up with new thoughts, ideas, inventions, and ways of doing things. The critical minds of INTJs question everything, logically pursuing every avenue of doubt. Tactfulness may not seem necessary to INTJs as long as they are persuaded in their own minds.
    The independence of the INTJ can lead to isolation and eccentricity (Howard Hughes was an INTJ). The INTJ needs to take the time to develop friendships that will help keep a balanced perspective.
    As a child, the INTJ’s active imagination and aggressive independence can be challenging for even the best parenting. The child seems almost like a miniature adult, competent in decision making, or at least confident in it. Consider Calvin in the comic strip of “Calvin and Hobbes” if you want to see a juvenile INTJ in action. (Bill Watterson, Calvin’s creator, illustrates the INTJ masterfully. No small wonder; he, too, is one.) INTJ children are driven in pursuit of exploration and experimentation.
    Though scoring well at school on formal tests, INTJs may be less motivated to learn by way of the usual, factual, step by step methods. They may daydream a lot, but can be high achievers if they want to be. Their most difficult years, academically, come in grade school. If they persevere and study in college, they will often be near the top of the class. It may be quite a turnaround from their formative years of education.
    INTJs want to improve and correct everything that comes along. They research and redesign continuously. Seeking challenges and disdaining routine, they may ignore the feelings of others, complicating their lives at school and work. They need to work at appreciating the views of others, or at least being harmonious. Their desire to control may be unwelcome.
    To bring about change, INTJs follow their inspirations. Their insights are deep and technical. They specialize in the challenges of the impossible. They prize learning, and are willing to invest time, energy, and money in education for themselves and for their children. Otherwise, INTJs can be quite frugal and thrifty. (Some INTJs end up being life time students; they love to learn.)
    INTJs have much to offer in innovation and theoretical reasoning. They love to present models for strategies of how things should work. They are sometimes missionaries of the greatest sacrifice, or international spies and con artists. Their special skills can be used for the good of all or for the promotion of their own selfish purposes.

    INTJ Sports Profile

    Win with Head

    INTJs are Introverted, left-brained NTs. They are methodical and strategic in their athletic pursuits, just as they are in life. INTJs feel a need to master their sport of interest in their heads as soon as possible, innately knowing their minds are their greatest athletic tools. Former major league pitcher Eric Show once spoke of his INTJ ways in college:
    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Show
    I was playing ball, playing guitar and taking courses in calculus, biology, chemistry, philosophy, and physics. I accepted the fact that there was a God, but which God – Allah, Buddha, Sri Chimnoy? I studied the Allen Watts movement, Zen, everything you can name. I studied the great works of St. Augustine, Freud, Russell, Marx.

    In 1988, completing his 7th year in the big leagues, Show stated:
    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Show
    I have dedicated my life to learning.
    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Show
    Learning what? What should I learn? I should learn everything! The question you should ask is, What should I leave out? (Emphasis his.)
    Not many INTJs are found in America’s most popular sports. Why so few? First, one wouldn’t expect to find many, considering INTJs small percentage of the U.S. populace.
    Second, sports are very much in the here and now, strongly utilizing the Sensing function. Accessing the “S” function does not come naturally for the highly iNtuitive INTJ.

    Third, INTJs do not possess the natural gross and fine motor skills of the Sensates. INTJs must work harder to develop these skills. If INTJs pursue sports tenaciously, they can become very proficient at a number of them, particularlyif they start early in life. They will quickly learn to take advantage of their superior mental skills, often making up for less-developed body movements. As we all know, proficiency in athletics requires both mental and physical dexterity. INTJs will learn to use their heads masterfully.
    Any sport or recreational hobby that challenges the mind will be of interest to the INTJ. Sailing, wind surfing, flying (full-size planes or models), and target shooting are just a few that they enjoy. Yet the more popular sports can be of interest too.

    Type Tips

    Encourage INTJs to get involved in athletic activities as children. They will require more time to develop their motor skills than Sensates.
    Golf is probably the most popular sport suited to INTJs. (INTJ Tom Kite was the PGA’s most consistent player of the 1980s.) Pitching is another area of expertise, allowing INTJs to excel in major league baseball.
    Mental and emotional exercises should be given high priority. (See mental section in this book.) Considering INTJs live life in their minds as much as any Type, it’s crucial they learn to keep their tensions and thoughts in check.
    When INTJs succumb to pressure in sporting events, their visual awareness can suffer appreciably; as left-brained dominant iNtuitives – especially adept at analyzing language – spatial matters in sports are hindered by psychological processes. Thus, it’s paramount that INTJs learn to relax and place high priority on the visual elements of their sport.

    PROBABLE INTJS IN SPORTS

    Baseball: Randy Johnson, Mike Mussina, Mark Wohlers, Gregg Olson, Eric Show, Tim Burke, Ed Whitson, David Cone
    Basketball: Keith Van Horn, Vladimir Stepania, Cal Bowdler, Don Nelson, Phil Jackson, Jack Marin, Tom McMillen, Alvan Adams, Rick Carlisle, Bill Hanzlik
    Golf: Bob Estes, Casey Martin, Matt Kuchar, Hale Irwin, Tom Kite, Bob Charles, Tom Weiskopf, Kermit Zarley, Mike McCullough, John Mahaffey, David Ledbetter
    Tennis: Tim Mayotte, Jeff Tarango
    Coaches:
    Baseball: Tony LaRussa
    Basketball: Don Nelson, Phil Jackson, Rick Carlisle, Gregg Popovich, Bill Hanzlik, Paul Westhead, Gary Williams, Dave Odom
    Football: George Seifert, Jim Fassel
    Sports Media: Peter Gammons
    Team Owners: Al Davis, Bud Selig

    POPULAR CAREER CHOICES:
    Engineering, computer science, law, science (life and physical), research, medicine, inventing, entrepreneur, business analysis, consulting, management, languages, and careers involving the management of human resources.
    Grey, peterbreter, kiwig0ld and 2 others thanked this post.



  2. #2
    INTJ - The Scientists

    INTJs are Introverted, left-brained NTs. They are methodical and strategic in their athletic pursuits, just as they are in life. INTJs feel a need to master their sport of interest in their heads as soon as possible, innately knowing their minds are their greatest athletic tools.
    Funny enough, I've been finding that out through Gladiatoral Fighting, where im in the regional top 5 because I studied ancient fighting techniques to master it.

  3. #3
    INTJ - The Scientists

    Third, INTJs do not possess the natural gross and fine motor skills of the Sensates. INTJs must work harder to develop these skills. If INTJs pursue sports tenaciously, they can become very proficient at a number of them, particularlyif they start early in life. They will quickly learn to take advantage of their superior mental skills, often making up for less-developed body movements. As we all know, proficiency in athletics requires both mental and physical dexterity. INTJs will learn to use their heads masterfully.
    Who said that?

    Any personality type can become the best in the world in any sport taking out physical limitations, given that start early at life and with have correct training. Most essential skill is to be thinking about what you are doing and keep correcting it, trying to limit the automatic part of what you want to improve.

  4. #4
    INTJ - The Scientists

    This type description comes from Your Key to Sports Success (12th Edition, 2006) by Jonathan Niednagel. An updated edition is expected to be released later this year, and if you would like to know more about Jonathan Niednagel's Brain Typing system you can purchase the book from his web site, BrainTypes.com - Understanding for the new millenium.
    I guess this guy said that... There is research pointing that there is 0 evidence of the popular "learning styles" (that each people have a way they learn better), and tests results showed evidence of the contrary (Pashler, H., McDaniel, M., Rohrer, D., & Bjork, R. (2009). Learning styles: Concepts and evidence. Psychological Science in the Public Interest, 3, 105-119).

    And that learning your "book" skills being another realm from learning motor-skills apparently is also not backed by evidence, the contrary has been show on recent research (serious research).

  5. #5
    INTJ - The Scientists

    This is me. I didn't know I was an INTJ until a few days ago, but this is me 116% V.A.T included.

  6. #6

    @Alx7 - the motor skills comments kind of had me scratching my head too. I played several sports when I was younger, one almost at the Olympic level. I was always "the natural" that seemed to be good at everything. If anything I put in far less effort than my teammates.

    I'm not trying to brag - this is something that was pointed out to me ad nauseum. It caused a lot of tension for the team sports and extra rivalry in the individual ones. The people who were working their asses off to be there didn't really appreciate it when I could achieve the same results just by phoning it in.
    Pyrogy thanked this post.


     

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