[INFJ] Jobs helping people all day and your introversion--How do you deal?

Jobs helping people all day and your introversion--How do you deal?

+ Reply to Thread
Hello Guest! Sign up to join the discussion below...
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 18
Thank Tree25Thanks

This is a discussion on Jobs helping people all day and your introversion--How do you deal? within the INFJ Forum - The Protectors forums, part of the NF's Temperament Forum- The Dreamers category; I was wondering if there are any INFJs currently in fields directly working with helping people all day, and how ...

  1. #1
    INFJ - The Protectors

    Jobs helping people all day and your introversion--How do you deal?

    I was wondering if there are any INFJs currently in fields directly working with helping people all day, and how you deal with that and your introversion? I am seriously considering going into speech pathology because I love every aspect of the field (language, helping people, etc.), and I have the patience and aptitude for it. In addition, I've shadowed a few speech pathologists at clinics and I LOVED the work; the time just flew by while I was observing and it really struck a chord with me, and it didn't even feel like WORK! I especially love working with kids.

    The problem? I'm NOT an extrovert, and I get drained out after all that intense interaction after a while. I have no problem with talking to people, even chitchat with parents; I'm not shy. It's just a matter of getting actually physically drained and starting to lose focus because of it. I notice right now, when dealing with people I'm totally energized for about 3 hours before I need a break, then I start to lose focus and enthusiasm, but I think I might be able to acclimitize myself and raise that to 4 hours. The only problem is... that's only half the working day, and I'd either need an hour in the middle of the day to be alone to recharge myself (which might not be practical or even possible), or figure something else out.

    This is really something I want to do; I feel great passion for it and love the work, and working with kids 1-on-1. But I want to figure out how to make it work with my introversion so I don't end up hating the job because it is too draining. So I was wondering how all you INFJs who have similar jobs (psychologist, counselor, physical therapist, etc., really anything working 1-on-1 helping people) deal with the constant interaction with people and your introversion.
    Last edited by megwini; 01-22-2012 at 02:50 AM.
    angularvelocity, Naqsh, Cordiform and 3 others thanked this post.



  2. #2
    INFJ - The Protectors

    I'd be curious to hear any suggestion on how to cope with all that external stimulus as well. I'm a student and a cashier, where friendly interaction with the customers is a priority. After about 5 or 6 hours the job starts wearing on me. At about 7 or 8 hrs, I can feel the repurcusions throughout the next day. I told my manager only to schedule me 6 hour shifts but even those can drain me. Are there any positive ways you all have been able to cope with these sort of situations? Or anyone that can relate?

  3. #3
    INFJ - The Protectors

    I have 7 and 1/2 work days spent with patients and colleagues. The hour there and back commuting is spent as 'me' time in addition to my hour lunch break (there for 8 and 1/2 hours in total) and time between ~6:30-11pm is mainly 'my time' too. So roughly, I have a near 1:1 ratio between time with people and myself which I find works fairly well. When I get home at times it would be nice to rant about my day a bit just to wind down a bit; but as I live on my own when I'm working, it's not too bad or the end of the world.

    Basically, get as much time alone as you can.

  4. #4
    INFP - The Idealists

    I'm a counsellor and work 1-1 with clients everyday. I'm lucky in that I schedule my appointments myself though, so I usually see no more than 4 clients a day (works out to about 5 hours of client work). As an INFJ and a very withdrawn 5, I've had to come up with a lot of strategies in the last couple of years. I do a lot of mindfulness meditation practice, because I find if I can keep myself in the moment even when I'm feeling stressed and ready to go home, i can push myself through.

    If you can space out the people you're working with, that's always helpful. I know some of my co-workers make sure to always leave at least 1/2 hour between their clients and create little rituals for themselves to stay grounded - things like saying a little prayer; lighting and blowing out a candle; listening to a specific song.

    I also have pretty much cleared my weeknight schedule. After a day of being around people, I need my evenings to do my own thing. Out of everything I do, the mindfulness has had the most effect, but it also took at least 6 months of steady practice to really start noticing the big changes in my energy and spending time with people.
    Naqsh, natamalie, lovelighting and 1 others thanked this post.

  5. #5
    Unknown Personality

    Everyone else has made pretty good suggestions. For myself, I've found that being with people is kind of like exercise: you do get better at it the more you work at it. I can't change my nature, so I'll always find people draining after a while and I'll always need alone time to recharge, but I can do an 8 hour day, sometimes more, if I take time for myself in between.

    The real killer is group vacations. "Group vacations": oxymoron?
    Hastings, Nox, leoni and 4 others thanked this post.

  6. #6
    INTJ - The Scientists

    It is very important to make time to be alone. My boss is a doctor, and he is very introverted. You can tell when he's getting tired of people or hasn't had enough time alone, because he gets very moody and fusses over little things. Whenever there's a space of time between patients and when it's his lunch break, he goes into his office and closes the door. Other people think his behavior is strange, but I totally understand.

    I'm studying to be a social science researcher (purpose is to use science to address social issues)... and with the little experience I have so far, it's a good fit because it involves participant observation... which basically means I kind of blend myself into my environment / the community and just listen. It's not that painful of a situation. (I think I've done this type of thing my whole life, really.) I only speak up to get clarification on something or if I needed to interview someone. Even with that, I need time alone to process everything at the end of the day. It is strange because I crave a whole lot of mental stimulation, but then I want everything to stop so I can work through it all. Sort through, organize, fold up the data in my mind.

    There are many ways to help people. Find what works for you. :)

  7. #7
    INFJ - The Protectors

    Quote Originally Posted by Elinor Dashwood View Post
    The real killer is group vacations. "Group vacations": oxymoron?
    Made me laugh, because it's so true. I can really only enjoy a vacation with my SO, and even then I often have to let him know, "Babe, I just need some quiet time right now."
    Elinor Dashwood and leoni thanked this post.

  8. #8
    INFJ - The Protectors

    Quote Originally Posted by lovelighting View Post
    Made me laugh, because it's so true. I can really only enjoy a vacation with my SO, and even then I often have to let him know, "Babe, I just need some quiet time right now."
    I went on holiday with my former SO for a week - a whole week with the same person near enough 24/7; I was quite proud of myself that my SO was still alive at the end of the holiday.

  9. #9
    INFJ - The Protectors

    I don't think you need to be extroverted to do speech pathology. My mother's an introvert, and a speech-language pathologist. She loves doing therapy one-on-one with her patients. For her, I think the "one-on-one" part of the job makes it less "tiring." She sees it less as "social interaction" and more as being professional.

    I also have a job where I help people all day - nothing important, but I have to talk to people pretty much all day. I'm usually tired at the end of the day, and I enjoy having evenings to myself. Although, I have to say, a lot of my tiredness doesn't necessarily have to do with talking to people all day so much as negative interactions with people all day, largely because I work with students flunking out of college and their over-indulgent parents who yell at us and tell us that it's all our fault (because their children are perfect, you see). When I get home, I want quiet time to myself to relax and not think about work. I listen to music, I read, and just enjoy the quiet.

    But why would an hour break in the middle of the work day be unreasonable? Most people get an hour-long lunch break in the middle of the day...why not use that to both eat and recharge?
    StElmosDream thanked this post.

  10. #10
    INFJ - The Protectors

    Quote Originally Posted by Sam727 View Post
    I'd be curious to hear any suggestion on how to cope with all that external stimulus as well. I'm a student and a cashier, where friendly interaction with the customers is a priority. After about 5 or 6 hours the job starts wearing on me. At about 7 or 8 hrs, I can feel the repurcusions throughout the next day. I told my manager only to schedule me 6 hour shifts but even those can drain me. Are there any positive ways you all have been able to cope with these sort of situations? Or anyone that can relate?
    I'm a cashier as well. Fun job, ain't it? ;o) Generally speaking, for myself, when I'm not at work, I'm home. I get my fill of people there at work. More than my fill. So I spent most of my free time at home. Some days it seems as though I barely keep even with energy gain vs. energy drain, lol.

    Besides a lot of quiet, alone time, my suggestion is to find something there at work that you can enjoy or appreciate. For me, the store I work at has self-checkouts that I get to sometimes monitor for part of my shift. I always try to get assigned there, because it's more indirect cashiering, lol. I also tend to appreciate the speedy/express checkouts, because while you end up dealing with more people during a shift, they get through your line quickly so you don't end up spending too much time with any one customer (which can get awkward if you're not very social or talkative).

    As a bonus, it can sometimes be a boon to your Fe to help so many people, so quickly too. :o)

    And I'm not sure how long you've been a cashier, but if nothing helps you, maybe this will. It gets easier over time. Especially the better you get at it. I tend to get a lot of compliments during my shift, and being appreciated makes it easier and a little more worthwhile.


 

Quick Reply Quick Reply

Register Now

Please enter the name by which you would like to log-in and be known on this site.
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.

Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Please enter a valid email address for yourself. *Note* To protect our forum from spam, we require all users to verify their email. We will send you a confirmation email after you've created an account. Be sure to check your "spam" box if you don't receive it in your inbox.

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Similar Threads

  1. [INFJ] Helping people out... without leaving the house?
    By Skyra in forum INFJ Forum - The Protectors
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 12-18-2011, 03:13 PM
  2. [Generation Y] what do people of our generation think of helping our planet?
    By Mother_Earth in forum Generation Y Forum
    Replies: 31
    Last Post: 06-25-2011, 11:43 AM
  3. [INFP] Starting Conversations/Helping People Who May Not Want Help
    By dandelionfluff in forum INFP Forum - The Idealists
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 09-15-2010, 11:06 PM
  4. Helping people, emotions, and INTP
    By Weliddryn in forum INFP Forum - The Idealists
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 10-17-2009, 04:38 PM
  5. Helping People - Why? Why not?
    By vanWinchester in forum General Psychology
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 06-30-2009, 10:15 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may post new threads
  • You may post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
All times are GMT -7. The time now is 02:20 PM.
Information provided on the site is meant to complement and not replace any advice or information from a health professional.
2014 PersonalityCafe