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This is a discussion on Ask a low carber within the Health and Fitness forums, part of the Topics of Interest category; I found this and thought it may be interesting....

  1. #41

    I found this and thought it may be interesting.
    Snakecharmer thanked this post.

  2. #42

    Quote Originally Posted by Snakecharmer View Post

    *Being fat is not, in and of itself, bad for your health. The behaviors that can make you fat – eating excess sugar and starch, not getting any exercise – can also ruin your health, and that’s why being fat is associated with bad health. But it’s entirely possible to be fat and healthy. It’s also possible to be thin while developing Type II diabetes and heart disease.
    .
    Snakecharmer, I like your posts, you usually make sense to me but I am going to disagree with the above. I think a fat person can be healthier if they got rid of the excess sugar in their diets and their cardiovascular health can improve substantially with exercise. What does not improve in fat people who eat healthier is any existing sleep apnea problems, joint problems and asthma-related problems, certain dermatological problems related to excess skin folds like infections, certain GI problems like reflux and a couple others, most of these problems still remain in the healthier eating fat because of the sheer physical space and excess pressure that fat tissue itself exerts.



    Quote Originally Posted by Scelerat View Post
    Thanks, just watched the movie and I wasn't surprised at the facts, but it was interesting and entertaining.
    I am a big fan of low carb but it gives me bad breath. Have you experienced any bad breath on the low carb diet and how did you remedy it.

  3. #43

    Quote Originally Posted by Haydn View Post


    I am a big fan of low carb but it gives me bad breath. Have you experienced any bad breath on the low carb diet and how did you remedy it.
    The bad breath on a ketogenic/low carb/etc diet stems from ketosis, the only way I've found to remedy it is the normal way of breath mints and other products, but be mindful of carbs in those products.

  4. #44

    Quote Originally Posted by Diligent Procrastinator View Post
    One meal you enjoyed made you a 300+ pound human... Interesting.

    Ever heard of balance? Ketosis is dangerous to the body. Being 300 pounds is dangerous to the body. I enjoy ALL my meals without counting anything and I'm doing just fine....



    Before you pull off a pathetic attempt at mockery, learn the difference between ketosis and ketoacidosis rofl. Ketoacidosis is a pathological metabolic condition--an extreme and uncontrolled form of ketosis that is most often seen in Type 1 diabetics (rarely T2 diabetics) and has to do with lack of insulin. Alcoholic ketoacidosis has to do with long term alcohol addiction resulting in liver damage. None of this has anything to do with the average person going on a lowered carb/low carb diet.

    Besides, anyone ignorant enough to think that their own experience with nutrition and weight applies across the board is blabbering out of their ass.

    _______

    OP,

    A 100 pound weight loss is a tremendous accomplishment. Congratulations on your success.

    Which low-carb diet do you prefer? Or do you customize one to your tastes and needs? Also, what do you think of the Mediterranean diet?
    Last edited by Sina; 05-30-2013 at 12:54 AM.
    Snakecharmer thanked this post.

  5. #45
  6. #46

    Quote Originally Posted by Boss View Post
    Which low-carb diet do you prefer? Or do you customize one to your tastes and needs? Also, what do you think of the Mediterranean diet?
    I'm not the OP, but I'm also curious about your first two questions. I'm always looking for more low-carb ideas.

    I'm a big fan of the Mediterranean diet. My father is Italian and eats that way naturally. He's in excellent health (aside from an autoimmune disorder that is well controlled). I grew up eating lots of olive oil, garlic, and tomatoes. lol

  7. #47

    Quote Originally Posted by Boss View Post



    Before you pull off a pathetic attempt at mockery, learn the difference between ketosis and ketoacidosis rofl. Ketoacidosis is a pathological metabolic condition--an extreme and uncontrolled form of ketosis that is most often seen in Type 1 diabetics (rarely T2 diabetics) and has to do with lack of insulin. Alcoholic ketoacidosis has to do with long term alcohol addiction resulting in liver damage. None of this has anything to do with the average person going on a lowered carb/low carb diet.

    Besides, anyone ignorant enough to think that their own experience with nutrition and weight applies across the board is blabbering out of their ass.

    _______

    OP,

    A 100 pound weight loss is a tremendous accomplishment. Congratulations on your success.

    Which low-carb diet do you prefer? Or do you customize one to your tastes and needs? Also, what do you think of the Mediterranean diet?
    I meant ketosis. Don't get all your info from people that agree with you. Have a good day.

  8. #48

    Quote Originally Posted by Diligent Procrastinator View Post
    I meant ketosis.
    Yeah, that's the problem in case you didn't notice lofl. How about you get the most basic as hell definitions right, especially when trying (and unsurprisingly failing) to troll a thread.

    Don't get all your info from people that agree with you. Have a good day.
    Hey Pot,
    Kettle here.

    Get your facts straight, like I said. Then, we'll talk about who's getting info from where.

    Oh, you have yourself a fabulous day. ;)


    ________

    @Snakecharmer

    I have started reading more about low-carbing in the past few months, as you know:). I am exploring Atkins, Paleo/Primal Blueprint etc. I don't have any specific diet suggestions, but here are two food blogs that have some fabulous low carb friendly meal ideas (and the first one has exquisite pictures; low carb food porn is always a motivator lol).

    1) I Breathe... I'm Hungry... - Deliciously Low Carb & Gluten Free

    2) The Healthy Foodie
    Snakecharmer thanked this post.

  9. #49

    Quote Originally Posted by Boss View Post
    Yeah, that's the problem in case you didn't notice lofl. How about you get the most basic as hell definitions right, especially when trying (and unsurprisingly failing) to troll a thread.


    Hey Pot,
    Kettle here.

    Get your facts straight, like I said. Then, we'll talk about who's getting info from where.

    Oh, you have yourself a fabulous day. ;)
    I have my facts straight. If you search for "benefits of X", that's what you'll find. Just because something has benefits doesn't mean it can't be dangerous.

  10. #50

    Quote Originally Posted by Diligent Procrastinator View Post
    I have my facts straight. If you search for "benefits of X", that's what you'll find. Just because something has benefits doesn't mean it can't be dangerous.
    Is ketosis dangerous? « The Eating Academy | Peter Attia, M.D. The Eating Academy | Peter Attia, M.D.

    You may have heard from your doctor that ketosis is a life-threatening condition. If so, your doctor is confusing diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) with nutritional ketosis, or keto-adaptation. First, some semantics. Our body can produce, from fat and some amino acids, three ketone bodies (a “ketone” refers the chemical structure where oxygen is double-bonded to carbon sandwiched between at least 2 other carbons). These ketone bodies we produce are: acetone, acetoacetone, and beta-hydroxybutyrate (B-OHB). [For anyone who is interested, they are the 3 most right structures on the figure, below.]

    Why do we make ketones? For starters, it’s a vital evolutionary advantage. Our brain can only function with glucose and ketones. Since we can’t store more than about 24 hours worth of glucose, we would all die of hypoglycemia if ever forced to fast for more than 24 hours. Fortunately, our liver can take fat and select amino acids (the building blocks of proteins) and turn them into ketones, first and foremost to feed our brains. Hence, our body’s ability to produce ketones is required for basic survival.

    What is diabetic ketoacidosis? When a diabetic (usually a Type I diabetic, but sometimes this occurs in very late-stage, insulin-dependent, Type II diabetics) fails to receive enough insulin, they go into an effective state of starvation. While they may have all the glucose in the world in their bloodstream, without insulin, they can’t get any into their cells. Hence, they are effectively going into starvation. The body does what it would do in anyone – it starts to make ketones out of fat and proteins. Here’s the problem: the diabetic patient in this case can’t produce any insulin, so there is no feedback loop and they continue to produce more and more ketones without stopping. By the time ketone levels (specifically, beta-hydroxybutyrate) approach 15 to 25 mM, the resulting pH imbalance leads to profound metabolic derangement and the patient is critically ill.

    But this state of metabolic derangement is not actually possible in a person who can produce insulin, even in small amounts. The reason is that a feedback loop prevents the ketone level from getting high enough to cause the change in pH that leads to the cascade of bad problems. A person who is said to be “keto-adapted,” or in a state of nutritional ketosis, generally has beta-hydroxybutyrate levels between about 0.5 and 3.0 mM. This is far less than the levels required to cause harm through acid-base abnormalities.

    Keto-adaption is a state, achieved through significant reduction of carbohydrate intake (typically to less than 50 grams per day), where the body changes from relying on glycogen as its main source of energy to relying on fat. Specifically, the brain shifts from being primarily dependent on glucose, to being primarily dependent on beta-hydroxybutyrate. This has nothing to do with what a diabetic patient is experiencing in DKA, but does illustrate how poorly informed and quick to react the medical community is. DKA and nutritional ketosis (or keto-adaptation) have as much in common as a house fire and a fireplace.
    Sina thanked this post.


     
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