Do Narcissists Know They're Narcissists? - Page 3

Do Narcissists Know They're Narcissists?

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This is a discussion on Do Narcissists Know They're Narcissists? within the General Psychology forums, part of the Topics of Interest category; ...

  1. #21

    Quote Originally Posted by Elwin View Post
    Sam Vaknin has an interesting YouTube channel on narcissism. He wrote a book on narcissism called "Malignant Self-Love" and claims to be one himself.
    There's actually an Australian documentary featuring him I, Psychopath. I watched it probably two years ago. It was the most frustrating doco I have ever watched.

    Found it on youtube (the other 4 clips are on this channel):


    "He is the world’s first civilian to willingly seek a diagnosis for psychopathy" apparently. And that's what the whole documentary was about.
    Elwin thanked this post.

  2. #22

    Quote Originally Posted by susurration View Post
    There's actually an Australian documentary featuring him I, Psychopath. I watched it probably two years ago. It was the most frustrating doco I have ever watched.

    Found it on youtube (the other 4 clips are on this channel):

    "He is the world’s first civilian to willingly seek a diagnosis for psychopathy" apparently. And that's what the whole documentary was about.
    I saw that a couple years ago as well and ripped it for my obnoxious archives. He appears to have found a way to use the persona of being a narcissist/psychopath as a source of narcissistic supply. He seems way too self-aware though, especially when you watch his YouTube videos. However, if I recall, the self-awareness issue was addressed in the documentary somehow, but I haven't seen it for awhile.
    susurration thanked this post.

  3. #23

    All I know is that when I rocked on up to a therapy session and expressed my concerns about my own potential narcissism my therapist actually laughed. She told me that if I were a narcissist then it wouldn't occur to me to ask the question let alone worry about it.

    She also told me that people with narcissistic personality disorder rarely seek help as they do not recognize any of their traits to be negative.

    I suspect people often think of narcissism in more general terms than is realistic. I've noticed narcissism is a personality disorder quoted a lot on internet forums because elements of narcissistic traits can, and do exist in many people, but that is a hell of a lot different from an individual who genuinely has narcissistic personality disorder.
    sparkles thanked this post.

  4. #24

    I've done a lot of reading on Narcissism. I seem to attract them for whatever reason, or I did in the past and needed to know what I was dealing with. I'm fairly narcissist free right now! LOL

    From what I understand the psychiatric community is now looking at Narcissism (NPD) as a lesser form of ASPD or Anti-Social Personality Disorder - what we used to call psychopaths. There is a continuum along the lines of narcissism from the mildly egotistical annoying ass to the malignant narcissist who destroys others for their own enjoyment and/or needs. I think the difference between a narcissist and a psychopath is that narcissists know others have feelings, they just aren't as important as his/hers (many more men than women are narcissists, more women are borderline [bpd]) the psychopath knows there's something called feelings but is so out of touch with his, or theoretically has no real 'conscience', that others appear to him to be objects, and therefore usable/disposable.

    There's more rationalization and projection with a narcissist - they literally project all their unwanted feelings and traits onto others - it's really creepy to watch. Psychopaths don't identify or project - they fill their desires and that's it. The other is never much considered at all except as a means or tool.

    Another trait is that they are really good actors, and frequently hold positions of power and/or influence. They use charm to seduce people whether in business or in personal life. Psychopaths don't. I heard one person say that the difference between them is that malignant narcissists are highly adapted psychopaths, the successful ones. 'Snakes in Suits' is a good book on this aspect of it.

    I would agree with the theory that it is a damaged, undeveloped and extremely fragile ego that precipitates narcissism. There is evidence that it has genetic roots rather than being primarily a psychological wounding defense mechanism gone awry like some other neuroses. Psychopaths also seem to be born, not made.

    Personality disorders are among the hardest to treat.. and Narcissists among the hardest - because they don't think anything is wrong with them and don't self-identify as needing help. Another interesting fact is that they can fool even the best of psychiatrists, unless that person specializes in it.

    Are they dangerous? IMHO, absolutely. They are the predators of our society, and the sicker ones are deadly; emotionally, psychologically and physically in the case of malignant ones.
    Kilgore Trout, strawberryLola and kelliss thanked this post.

  5. #25

    Not often, no. When they find out, I think they find it cute.

  6. #26

    Apparently some of them do. The psychforums has a section for NPD which I have browsed a several occasions and there are a few narcissist posters there: Narcissistic Personality Disorder Forum though I am not sure though if those people have discovered it on their own or if they were referred by family members or friends.

    I do agree that there is a continuum rather than distinct classification that a person either has NPD or they don't have it. There are also two subtypes of narcissism - grandiose and vulnerable. The descriptions of aggressive pushy exhibitionist narcissists are likely to be about people with grandiose form of NPD. Vulnerable ones actually aren't that easy to tell. They can appear to be rather reserved, shy, and modest on the outside. According to what I've read narcissists do periodically have rare but very intense outbreaks of self-criticism where they realize their own faults. From what I have witnessed of one vulnerable narcissist though his self-criticism tended to be completely misdirected. For example during one outbreak he concluded that people did not like him because of his annoying voice.

    I've had a chance to spend time with somebody who had a very mild form of narcissism. I remember calling his attention to a rather small mistake that he has made. He hesitated and proceeded to look at me with a blank stare like what I have said just didn't compute. Then to my surprise he turned it around as if it was my fault. I took the situation apart and again explained where he has made a mistake. He became jittery and didn't say anything the second time so I switched the subject to something else. But from what point on I understood that something was off about this guy, that a normal person would be able to easily admit making such a simple mistake and accept the responsibility. His response to this situation clearly did not what I would have expected. If he could not accept blame for such a simple mistake, I doubt that he would be able to determine and admit to having some mild form of NPD.
    Ravenstar thanked this post.

  7. #27

    In some way, i guess narcissists know that they are but for some people having that kind of mentality, i think some of them do not know that they are being narcissistic.


 
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