Why do people make fun of the mentally disabled people? - Page 7

Why do people make fun of the mentally disabled people?

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This is a discussion on Why do people make fun of the mentally disabled people? within the General Psychology forums, part of the Topics of Interest category; Originally Posted by tuna uhh jsyk laughing at a disabled person is hurtful and cruel regardless of your intent. Not ...

  1. #61

    Quote Originally Posted by tuna View Post
    uhh jsyk laughing at a disabled person is hurtful and cruel regardless of your intent.
    Not necessarily. I don't have any malevolent intentions. I just hear a funny sound or see a funny facial expression and laugh, no harm done. If any other person made that sound or face I'd laugh. They don't have to be handicapped.

    People are too damn sensitive. Political correctness is the enemy of humor. Especially when it's taken to the extreme.

    In fact, some disabled people use their set-backs to make people laugh. They realize they make normal things funny and use that to bring people joy. There are many movies with handicapped people doing hilarious things. Little people also use their shortcomings (oops... no pun intended) for hilarity.

    They can't change it, why cry about it?
    ElectricSparkle thanked this post.

  2. #62

    Quote Originally Posted by Voodo Chile View Post
    We've probably all seen a person sitting in a wheelchair, dribbling and making ridiculous noises. Just look the other way and block them out. Just deny they exist or I'll probably end up with an over protective caretaker on my heels.
    That's actually almost ruder. Ignore a person's existence? How could that even be considered nice? At least if you're laughing, you're acknowledging them, even if it is in a cruel way. But to be treated like nothing, like little more than a dead leaf on the sidewalk or a piece of litter someone threw down? No, that's downright gut-wrenching.

    Besides, the person in the wheelchair is probably just as smart as you, you just can't see it. I can't tell you how many times people have been ignored in favor of their "caretaker" just because they look different.

    And it would be rare if whoever you can talk to--wheelchair-user or someone else--would hate any questions being asked. If they do, it's probably just because they're having a bad day, and everyone has those.

    Quote Originally Posted by tuna View Post
    uhh jsyk laughing at a disabled person is hurtful and cruel regardless of your intent.
    Depends on if the person is trying to get a laugh out of you or not. Depends on if the person is laughing themselves or not (at the same thing you're laughing about). Don't social norms apply in this situation like any other, as a general rule?

  3. #63

    Ignorance is bliss...
    I don't personally see anything wrong with pointing out something. "That guy over there smells like piss"
    As long as they don't hear it. If they don't hear it then they have nothing to worry about.

    My brother is good at picking up peoples disabilities and going "hey look at that person" to me. And he often finds it quite funny.
    Most of the time i wont find it funny. But its not like he is doing much wrong. Its not like hes making it public and going "hey look at this everybody" and tormenting them. The most i can say is "dont point you idiot" and then walk past them as if they were a normal person. And if you were walking past someone who is 'normal' then you wouldn't stare at them constantly as you walk past. You might take a quick glimpse at them. So in a way you're ignoring them.

    Maybe it's not that they're making fun, but that mentally disabled people can be funny... They do funny things and make funny sounds. You'll notice that people will laugh, but only the idiotic will be cruel about it.
    I think that sums it up quite well.

  4. #64

    Quote Originally Posted by Voodo Chile View Post
    My brother is good at picking up peoples disabilities and going "hey look at that person" to me. And he often finds it quite funny.
    Most of the time i wont find it funny. But its not like he is doing much wrong. Its not like hes making it public and going "hey look at this everybody" and tormenting them. The most i can say is "dont point you idiot" and then walk past them as if they were a normal person. And if you were walking past someone who is 'normal' then you wouldn't stare at them constantly as you walk past. You might take a quick glimpse at them. So in a way you're ignoring them.
    Your brother's not making it public, but he's intentionally singling people out to make fun of. Anyone could overhear you, thus perpetuate the trend. And it's more than likely that whoever he's pointing at has noticed, because after a while one can get hyper-aware of how different everyone sees them to be.

    I'm not entirely sure why disabilities are so hilarious; people don't laugh at glasses, and that's a worldwide accepted disability. Why is it funny just because they do things different than you? Is a cast funny on someone who's broken their leg? They have to use a wheelchair or crutches to be mobile.

    There's a difference between walking past someone because they're part of the crowd and walking past because they're not worth your notice.

    For the record, I'm not speaking for only one subtype, but for both physically and mentally handicapped. It's probably biased towards the physical, but just because someone is mentally handicapped it doesn't mean they're not aware of this stuff, how it makes them feel.

    I probably shouldn't have replied in the first place; the discrimination/ignorance has a tendency to work me up...
    tuna and MCRTS thanked this post.

  5. #65

    Quote Originally Posted by Paradigm View Post
    Your brother's not making it public, but he's intentionally singling people out to make fun of. Anyone could overhear you, thus perpetuate the trend. And it's more than likely that whoever he's pointing at has noticed, because after a while one can get hyper-aware of how different everyone sees them to be.

    I'm not entirely sure why disabilities are so hilarious; people don't laugh at glasses, and that's a worldwide accepted disability. Why is it funny just because they do things different than you? Is a cast funny on someone who's broken their leg? They have to use a wheelchair or crutches to be mobile.

    There's a difference between walking past someone because they're part of the crowd and walking past because they're not worth your notice.

    For the record, I'm not speaking for only one subtype, but for both physically and mentally handicapped. It's probably biased towards the physical, but just because someone is mentally handicapped it doesn't mean they're not aware of this stuff, how it makes them feel.

    I probably shouldn't have replied in the first place; the discrimination/ignorance has a tendency to work me up...
    I agree with what you're saying. I don't have a disability, but I do know what's it like to be stared at, because I have a pretty noticeable skin condition. It must be a million times worse for someone who has a mental or physical condition. For those who look at people with disabilities and laugh, put yourself in their shoes for a day. These people have already illnesses which they have to deal with on a day to day basis. They're already suffering. Why should they be subjected to stares, as if they were nothing but freaks in a freak circus, or animals in the zoo? Are they less human, just because they have a disability?
    ElectricSparkle thanked this post.

  6. #66

    Some will laugh, some will put on their shiny white knight armors, others don't care one way or the other.

    Yea, yea. You might want to build an hierarchy of social acceptance in regards to the options available, at the end of the day however, it's all fairly moot, given that nothing is going to change.

  7. #67

    Quote Originally Posted by MCRTS View Post
    I agree with what you're saying. I don't have a disability, but I do know what's it like to be stared at, because I have a pretty noticeable skin condition. It must be a million times worse for someone who has a mental or physical condition. For those who look at people with disabilities and laugh, put yourself in their shoes for a day. These people have already illnesses which they have to deal with on a day to day basis. They're already suffering. Why should they be subjected to stares, as if they were nothing but freaks in a freak circus, or animals in the zoo? Are they less human, just because they have a disability?
    Well said.

    The only thing I would add is that the handicapped don't want pity. We want to be accepted. Not singled out, not ignored, not seen as inferior. We're people, just like everyone else.

    And I dunno about you, but I'm not "suffering" from a disability. It's just... there. It doesn't bother me that much, only people's reactions do.

    This sort of thing is almost as bad as being made fun of:
    Old lady: *GASP* You poor thing!
    Me: Uh?
    Old lady: Aw, bless you for being out in public!
    Me: I'm shopping for groceries, I don't--
    Old lady: So cute! *toddles off*
    Me: ...'Cause this isn't as mundane as Western life gets...

    Quote Originally Posted by Erbse View Post
    Yea, yea. You might want to build an hierarchy of social acceptance in regards to the options available, at the end of the day however, it's all fairly moot, given that nothing is going to change.
    I'm sure the other minorities--black slaves, German Jews, etc.--would have loved to hear that in the past. You can tell that to the LGBT group, too. See how it works.
    tuna, freeagen and Verthani thanked this post.

  8. #68

    Quote Originally Posted by Paradigm View Post
    I'm sure the other minorities--black slaves, German Jews, etc.--would have loved to hear that in the past. You can tell that to the LGBT group, too. See how it works.
    Well, pardon me for my lack of emotional involvement regarding strangers. Although, I'm certainly on the indifference spectrum rather than the mocking side. If people are too busy feeling sorry for themselves and who they are, that isn't much of my business, nor my fault.

    Although, laughing doesn't necessarily imply a sense of mocking, or putting the person in question down. Most people are plainly too busy projecting themselves into the situation and how "oh so horrible it'd feel" - Granted, being laughed at isn't the most pleasant thing in the world, certainly wasn't when I was a kid, but I'm no kid anymore. Quite the opposite, if I do something dumb, stupid, or "retarded", I even gotten to the point where I can laugh about myself.

    In case of a mentally disabled person the matter of laughing can have various reasons, and I don't think you're in any place to judge them without taking the disabled person's opinion about it in regard, assuming the supposed offender doesn't go out of his way to verbally put the person down by mocking him. For all the emotion projecting people though, why should people suppress their urge to laugh? If it's there, might as well make room for it - inevitably it always depends on how things are taken care of towards the outside, to avoid mis-perceptions.

    There are always multiple sides involved, and if anything I'm rather tired of social obligations, albeit the reason I stick to my own moral code. People may pretend and crave collective empathy / sympathy for all I care, but leave me out of that. I don't need to donate x bucks a month to a "good cause" thinking I'd have so helped someone out and feel better about myself.

    There's a vast difference between light hearted humor (which may not be down your alley, still valid none the less) and serious mocking.

  9. #69

    Quote Originally Posted by Erbse View Post
    There are always multiple sides involved, and if anything I'm rather tired of social obligations, albeit the reason I stick to my own moral code. People may pretend and crave collective empathy / sympathy for all I care, but leave me out of that. I don't need to donate x bucks a month to a "good cause" thinking I'd have so helped someone out and feel better about myself.

    There's a vast difference between light hearted humor (which may not be down your alley, still valid none the less) and serious mocking.
    The only thing I was calling into question was your statement that nothing changes. Everything changes at some point. There's tons of civil rights movement in the present and in the past; to say they haven't changed how the world perceives is inaccurate.

    We're not talking about a mass group of faceless people in this thread--or, at least, I don't think we are? What we are talking about is why people make fun of (in a cruel manner; there's various types of bullying) others. I believe the OP asked why "normal" (non-handicapped) feel like they're better than the disabled people.

    Now, I agree, in the terms of "someone looking in," we should always ask how the one (seemingly) being bullied feels. Maybe they were friends making light of a situation; maybe it wasn't what you thought. As an outsider, nothing is ever certain, and it's best to get information from everyone involved--but in this kind of case, if it feels downright wrong, then you're probably not far off.

    Personally I'm desperately curious as to why disability is funny to some. I'm curious as to why bullying makes people feel better. I'm curious as to why the disabled are treated as inhuman. (And if one doesn't think they are... Well, that's almost willed ignorance.) This sort of behavior has never made sense to me as a physically handicapped person, and while I don't think I'll ever truly understand it, I want to know what/how people think.

    And I don't think fear is a good answer. Nor is low self-confidence. Both are cliche and, in my experience, are mere excuses for the real underlying cause.

    But, Erbse, I'm not asking you to care. I don't give a flip if you donate. (I don't know where you're from, but in the US we have this "Jerry's Kids" telethon that thrives on nothing but pity donations.) I understand being downright exhausted from society's notions, and this isn't your fight. I wasn't trying to "recruit" you or anything--far from it! I just think that things can change at some point, and that's why I quoted you.
    Erbse, Nonconsensus and Verthani thanked this post.

  10. #70

    Quote Originally Posted by Paradigm View Post
    Personally I'm desperately curious as to why disability is funny to some. I'm curious as to why bullying makes people feel better.
    Funny and bullying in that sense perhaps shouldn't be put in conjunction per se, as it gives away a false sense of judgment being passed. As you've said, the "low self-esteem" answer is cliché, overused and perhaps simplistic, yet holds truth in most cases. I'd also dare to say that it's typically extrovert who remain long term bullies, or introverts who have a disorder. Bullying strikes me as nothing else than feeding a certain need a person has, that has to come from the outside, some sort of validation, or underline one's own "power", so they think anyway. What the cause specifically would be, I do not know.

    In fact, back the in my earlier child hood I've been quite a bully myself, as for the reasons why, I do not know. In retrospective I cannot find explanations that could justify such behavior, and if anything it makes me feel bad, as I hate to be incapable of explaining my actions. Though, what's done is done, and I perhaps wouldn't have grown out of it, if I happened to be able to permanently justify it.

    In many cases it may just be a maturity issue, if you've never experienced the side of being the bullied however, chances are you'll never see much wrong with bullying. You're "stronger" hence you "deserve" more - until the day someone "stronger" comes by and basically makes you realize how the flipside of the whole apparatus works. The options are to either admire him, team up, become friends and keep on going, or to introspect and gain some insights. With lacking/malfunctioning introspection however chances are many will never come to learn some very fundamental aspects of life and will forever depend on external stimuluses.

    I'm curious as to why the disabled are treated as inhuman. (And if one doesn't think they are... Well, that's almost willed ignorance.) This sort of behavior has never made sense to me as a physically handicapped person, and while I don't think I'll ever truly understand it, I want to know what/how people think.
    I wouldn't really say treated as inhuman, at least I've never done it. Though, matter of fact, most these people have no practical relevance for non handicapped people (dependent on the degree of illness). You'd never take a deaf person to the movies, or a club (plus you'd have to learn sign language, which isn't a bad thing, but again, extra work), or not do physical activities such as playing soccer with someone who has issues controlling his motor activity appropriately.

    It is not that they'd be less human as a being (unless being in their own world, far off what a normal being experiences the world as, which still wouldn't make them less human, but completely inaccessible for the average person without spending extraordinary amount of effort) and you can still hold conversation of depth etc. with them. So to speak many handicapped people would make more than valid conversation/intellectual peers, if not more so than normal people even, but they simply cannot properly partake in most of the modern free time activities without being crapload of extra work many simply aren't willing to do - or cannot compete in most things it would be necessary for a normal person to enjoy an activity wholeheartedly.

    Anyway, I actually have to apologize for my earlier tone, I've been headachy but taken care of the issue by now
    Paradigm thanked this post.


     
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