Judging penis size by comparing index, ring fingers - New Korean Study

Judging penis size by comparing index, ring fingers - New Korean Study

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This is a discussion on Judging penis size by comparing index, ring fingers - New Korean Study within the Current Events forums, part of the Topics of Interest category; Each of the men who took part in the Korean study were all aged over 20 and had been admitted ...

  1. #1

    Judging penis size by comparing index, ring fingers - New Korean Study

    Each of the men who took part in the Korean study were all aged over 20 and had been admitted to hospital for urological surgery. After having their height, weight and fingers measured the size of their flaccid and fully stretched penises were recorded while the men were under anaesthetic. The scientists discovered that while each man's height, ring finger length and digit ratio were all associated with the size of his penis, the digit ratio was the sole "significant predictive factor" for stretched penile length. Reporting their findings in the Asian Journal of Andrology, the scientists said the individual lengths of the ring and index fingers had nothing to with penis size. "However the results. did show that stretched penile length correlated with digit ratio, as men with a lower digit ratio tended to have a longer penile length," they wrote. "This means that it is not finger length but digit ratio that can predict adult penile length." [1] In the new study, Choi and colleagues compared the digit ratios of 144 Korean men aged 20 and older who were being treated for urological surgery. Researchers measured the index and ring fingers of each man's right hand and compared the ratio to the length of each man's fully stretched, flaccid penis (the latter data obtained under anesthesia). [2]

    MONDAY, July 4 (HealthDay News) -- A look at the relative length of a man's index and ring fingers might be a good predictor of the length of his penis, according to South Korean researchers. They found that the ratio between the second and fourth digits on a man's right hand seemed to correlate to the length of his flaccid and stretched penis, with a lower index-to-ring finger length ratio indicating a longer penis. The key to this relationship may lie in the womb, the team added. [2]

    A recent Korean study has claimed that a man's finger can tell a lot about his manhood. After examining 144 Korean men aged 20 or older who were in hospital for urological surgery and who signed away their right to dignity, the team anaesthetized the sample group to measure the size of the finger along with that of penis and found that while each man's height, ring finger length and digit ratio were all associated with the size of his penis, the digit ratio was the sole "significant predictive factor" for stretched penile length. [3] Sorry boys, but it does seem the size of your fingers is a pretty good guide to your manhood. Long regarded as a myth and source of much amusement, scientists have now confirmed that the length of a man's index finger relative to his ring finger can reveal his penis size. Korean scientists studied 144 men and discovered that the ratio between their second and fourth fingers - known as digit ratio - was directly linked to penile length. [1] The Korean scientists said that the ratio of the index and ring fingers was thought to be fixed early in development, in a similar way to how penile growth is influenced by a baby's exposure to testosterone while in the womb. They said based on their findings, they believed that higher prenatal exposure to androgen hormones like testosterone could be responsible for both the lower digit ratio and longer penile length. "Based on this evidence, we suggest that digit ratio can predict adult penile size and that the effects of prenatal testosterone may in part explain the differences in adult penile length," they wrote. [1] The researchers at Gachon University Gil Hospital in Incheon, South Korea, admitted only Korean men were measured for the study, so the penis-finger link might not apply to all races. The findings offered "circumstantial evidence prenatal testosterone is responsible for both penile length and digit formation," said Denise McQuade, of Skidmore College, New York, who was not involved in the study. It is not all bad news for men with shorter ring fingers. A British study last year said that men whose index fingers are longer than their ring fingers are one-third less likely to develop prostate cancer. [4] Stretched length is thought to correlate to erect length, the researchers said. They found that, in general, the lower the ratio of the lengths of the two fingers, the longer the penis was in its stretched state. The key to this relationship may lie in the womb, the team said. The findings offered "circumstantial evidence that prenatal testosterone is responsible for both traits (penile length and digit formation,)" said Denise McQuade at Skidmore College in New York, who was not involved in the study. Other recent findings have suggested that men with a lower ratio have a more symmetrical face and are more attractive to women, a phenomenon that has been referred to as the "sexy ratio," according to the Los Angeles Times. [5]

    The situation was more complicated for men. The team found no difference in the ratio between gay and straight men unless they had several older brothers -- a factor which had previously been linked to being homosexual. Such men were found to have an unusually low ratio of the finger lengths. Other recent research has suggested that men with a lower ratio have a more symmetrical face and are more attractive to women, a phenomenon known as the "sexy ratio." And just last year, researchers from Warwick University and the Institute of Cancer Research in Britain reported that a man's risk of developing prostate cancer is related to the ratio of the two digits. Men whose index finger in longer than their ring finger were found to be one-third less likely to develop prostate cancer. [6] Well, new research demonstrates that there might actually be something to the idea that there is a correlation between length. and length. A team of South Korean researchers studied 144 men, and came up with what may be a reliable guide: the ratio of the length of a man's index finger to that of his ring finger. [5]

    The scientists measured 144 men aged 20 years and older under anaesthetic who were having urology surgery. The "digit ratio" in this study, published in the Asian journal of Andrology, refers to the length of the index finger divided by ring finger length. [4] The study, published in the Asian Journal of Andrology, measured the "digital ratio" (the index finger length divided by the length of the ring finger) of some 144 men and found that the lower the figures, the longer the penis. [7]

    Digit ratio, or the length of the second, index finger relative to the fourth, ring finger, was calculated. In most women, those two fingers are about the same length, but men's index fingers tend to be shorter than their ring fingers, giving a lower digit ratio. The length of the penis was measured both when it was flaccid and when it had been stretched to its full length, according to the Los Angeles Times. [5] Digit ratio - the length of the second, index finger relative to the fourth, ring finger - was determined. In most women, these two fingers are about the same length. Men's index fingers tend to be shorter than their ring fingers, giving a lower digit ratio. This is thought to be due to the effect of the male hormone testosterone in the womb, with higher levels leading to a relatively longer ring finger. [8]

    The bigger the difference between the two fingers, the smaller the size of a man's penis. Or, to look at the other way, the longer his ring finger is compared to his index finger, the better endowed he is. "Based on this evidence, we suggest that digit ratio can predict adult penile size," they concluded.Researchers believe the link between finger ratios and penis length is caused by exposure to the androgen sex hormones, specifically testo. [9] Previous studies have shown that the right hand may be more sensitive to the influence of testosterone. The so-called "digit ratio" in this study refers to the length of the index finger divided by the length of the ring finger. [10] Studies have found that the ratio between the second and fourth finger is related to sperm count, likelihood of heart attack, hand preference, facial masculinity and more. One small 2002 study published in the journal Urology found a correlation between the length of the index finger and genital size in healthy men under 40, suggesting that testosterone exposure in the womb affects the growth of both. [11] Hands and fingers tell more about other parts of the body than commonly thought. It is more applicable in men than women. A study conducted at South Korea detailed its findings that people who have the shorter index finger (second finger) than the index finger (fourth finger) will have a longer stretched penile length. [12] "According to our data. the shorter index (second) finger than ring (fourth) finger you have, the longer stretched penile length you have," wrote Tae Beom Kim at the urology department of Gachon University Gil Hospital in Incheon, South Korea, in reply to questions from Reuters. [10] The study was led by Tae Beom Kim at the urology department of Gachon University Gil Hospital in Incheon, South Korea. The study conducted by Tae Beom Kim focused on both finger length and its link with penile length and also on the previous study revealing the influence of prenatal testosterone on finger development and penile length. [12] Previous studies have shown strong evidence that prenatal testosterone may determine finger development as well as penile length, a relationship that Kim and his colleagues launched a study to focus on. The study involved 144 men suffering from urological problems that did not affect the length of their penis, which was measured under anesthesia. The measurements were later compared to the difference in length between their second and fourth fingers on the right hand. [10]

    South Korean scientists have shown that relative finger length is a good indicator of penis length. The long and the short of it, based on the findings, is that most men would probably like to have a well endowed ring finger on their right hand. A team led by Tae Beom Kim of Gachon University in Incheon said it investigated this apparent relationship because it believed there was a lack of research on the male appendage. [8] One member of the team carefully measured the lengths of the index and ring fingers on the subject's right hand before surgery -- left hands are thought to be more variable. A second team member then measured penis length immediately after the subject had been anesthetized. The length was measured both when the penis was flaccid and when it had been stretched as much as possible. [6]

    In the new study, researchers at Gachon University Gil Hospital in South Korea recruited 144 volunteers 20 years of age and older who were going to undergo urological surgery. While the men were under anesthesia, the researchers measured their finger lengths and both their flaccid and stretched penis lengths. [11]

    A smaller ratio between the second and fourth fingers is linked to a longer stretched penis size, researchers report today (July 4) in the Asian Journal of Andrology. The findings go beyond providing a new finger ratio-based pick-up line for men in bars, however; researchers say that a quick look at a man's fingers could reveal his exposure to male hormones in the womb, providing a hint about his risk for hormone-driven diseases like prostate cancer. [11] The report has been published in Asian Journal of Andrology and the team is of the opinion that there is no correlation between the individual lengths of the ring and index fingers with the size of penis. [3] HONG KONG (Reuters Life!) - Hands may say more about their owners than commonly thought, especially in the case of men. Men whose index fingers are shorter than their ring fingers may have longer penises, according to a South Korean study published in the Asian Journal of Andrology. [10]

    In women, the index and ring fingers are generally the same length, while in men the index finger is generally shorter. Researchers from UC Berkeley created a stir in 2000 when they reported that lesbian women tended to have a ratio of the two finger lengths that was more typical of men. [6] Now a team of Korean researchers has produced what may be a more reliable guide: the ratio of the length of his index finger to that of his ring finger. [6]

    Combined with other information, digit ratio offers the potential for clinical usefulness," wrote McQuade in an email reply to questions from Reuters. Female index and ring fingers tend to be about the same length, she added. [10]

    The closer in length your two fingers are, the more "jumbo heat" you're packing, as Jon Stewart would say. Why knowing this is important is anyone's guess, however, the team says the findings link the phenomenon to another study that links height with prenatal androgen exposure. Higher exposure to prenatal androgens such as testosterone generally result in taller people. Now we know it is also "responsible for both the lower digit ratio and the longer penile length". That "prenatal" caveat also means it can't be applied retrospectively, so for now, you'll have to stick to Swedish pumps and suspended weights. Ignore those emails.) [13] The prenatal hormone exposures and genetic processes that link fingers to penises are still unknown, the researchers wrote, though testosterone in the womb seems to play a role. If the findings hold, wrote Skidmore College biologist Denise Brooks McQuade in an editorial accompanying the study, digit ratio could provide an at-a-glance measure for doctors to gauge how much testosterone their patients were exposed to in the womb. That makes digit-ratio measurement far more than a fancy bar trick, wrote McQuade, who was not involved in the research. "Hotness' aside, the value of digit ratio research for the biomedical scientist or clinician may come from the predictive abilities and risk-assessment qualities of the measurement for clinical conditions," she wrote. [11]

    In a journal commentary, Denise Brooks McQuade of Skidmore College, Saratoga Springs, N.Y., said the study results "provide convincing support for a relationship between digit ratio and penile length." She added that the findings might have real value for research into clinical conditions linked to developmental issues in men. [2] The average flaccid and stretched penile lengths of the men were 7.7 centimetres and 11.7cm respectively, while the average digit ratio was 0.97. In April another study found men with lower digit ratios were regarded as better looking by women, possibly because their faces were more symmetrical. [8] The Korean team also found that height was a good predictor of flaccid penile length but stretched penile length - which is a better indicator of erection length - was linked to digit ratio. [8]

    "However the results. did show that stretched penile length correlated with digit ratio, as men with a lower digit ratio tended to have a longer penile length", claimed the team. "This means that it is not finger length but digit ratio that can predict adult penile length". [3]

    "In the present study, patients with a lower digit ratio tended to have a longer stretched penile length." They added that the length of the stretched and flaccid penis does show "a strong correlation" with an erect penile length. [2]

    The researchers noted that penile length and the second-to-fourth digit ratio in males are "thought to be fixed early in development." In each case, this involves a common set of genes that regulate prenatal hormones (including testosterone) to influence both limb development and the development of the urogenital system. [2]

    Digit ratios are noninvasive and easy to measure and thus may provide a surrogate for studying prenatal development in men, wrote Dr. Denise Brooks McQuade of Skidmore College in Saratoga Springs, N.Y. in an editorial accompanying the study. [6]

    While previous studies have indicated links between digit ratio and prostate cancer, none have revealed why men who undergo normal puberty have different penis sizes. [1] According to the team, digit ratio "has been correlated with a number of aspects of reproductive biology and sexual behaviour over the past decade, including a link with the risk of developing prostate cancer". [13]

    "During the fetal period, high concentrations of testosterone lead to high testicular activity, resulting in a lower digit ratio," explained a team led by In Ho Choi of Gacheon University Gil Hospital in Incheon. [2]

    The lower that ratio, the longer the penis may be, the researchers wrote Monday in the Asian Journal of Andrology, according to the Los Angeles Times. The team, led by Tae Beom Kim of Gachon University in Incheon, said it investigated this apparent correlation because it believed there was a lack of research on the male appendage, according to the Sydney Morning Herald. [5] Dr. Tae Beom Kim, a urologist at Gachon University in Incheon, Korea, and his colleagues studied 144 men over the age of 20 who were undergoing urological surgery for conditions that do not affect the length of the penis. [6]

    The study was conducted on 144 men suffering from urological problems in which cases the penile length did not affect the urological problems and was measured under anaesthesia. [12]

    KOREAN scientists say the ratio between the second and fourth fingers is linked to stretched penile length. [13] Researchers in Korea have established that the ratio between the length of the second and the fourth finger indicates how well nature has endowed a man. [9]

    Although it may seem like the results are coming out of left field, they actually are not. A variety of studies suggest that the ratio of the two finger lengths is determined by prenatal exposure to sex hormones, both testosterone and estrogen. It is not unreasonable to assume that penis length might also be. [6] Previous studies have shown strong evidence that testosterone in the womb may determine finger development as well as penis length. [4]

    The team found that, in general, the lower the ratio of the lengths of the two fingers, the longer the stretched length of the penis. [6]

    Are your index and ring fingers close to the same size? Congratulations, you're more likely than men with mismatched digits to have a long penis. [11] Men: Hold up your right hand. Are your index and ring fingers close to the same size? Congratulations, you're more likely than men with mismatched digits to have a long penis! The article does not discuss width, but if you are one to raise this topic up in a conversation, you may want to expound on your own particular findings and fingers and cause a stir. [14]

    The hand in question was the right one and the fingers were the second and fourth - otherwise known as index and ring. The subjects were anaesthetised, which is important, because their tockleys needed to be torpid so the scientists could stretch them. [13]

    An index finger that is shorter than the ring finger may indicate a longer penis, according to scientists. [4]

    Wondering how big (or small) he is? Ask him to lift up his hand - the answer lies in his index finger. [7]



    Now, a new South Korean study sheds some proof light on the matter, exposing the truth behind the extent of his, erm, bulk. Forget measuring his shoes for size. Now you can sum up his package with just a glance at his fingers - the shorter, the better bigger, if these new findings are anything to go by. [7] The idea that men's finger ratio and hormone exposure are linked is not a new one. [11] To make sure there was no preconceived notions, one measurer was designated the fingers and another got the goolies. Men who were admitted with conditions that affect their penis size - such as hypospadia or urethral stricture - were excluded. [13] You thought your penis size had nothing to do with your finger size? Think again. [13]

    Stretched penis length is statistically correlated to the size of the penis when fully erect. [11] The average flaccid penis length, the researchers found, was 3.0 inches (7.7 centimeters), with a range of 1.6 to 4.7 in. (4 to 12 cm). [11]

    The lower the digit ratio, the study found, the longer the penis was likely to be. [11] Many researchers investigating various behavioural and physiological conditions have in the past examined links between digit ratio and hormone activity. Some believe the digit ratio is a predictor of personality traits such as aggression. [1]



    ''In order to minimise the effect of temperature and touch on penile size, penile length measurements were taken immediately after the patient undressed,'' it explained in the Asian Journal of Andrology. [8] The scientists concluded that prenatal testosterone levels also influenced adult penile length. [8]



    Men and women are what is termed sexually dysmorphic in terms of finger lengths. [6] Callouses can indicate manual work, chewed nails a nervous disposition, and now finger length can reveal to the careful observer the length of a man's penis. [9]

    Lengths in a flaccid and a fully stretched position were recorded while the men were under anaesthetic. [8] The scientists descended on 144 Korean men aged 20 or older who were in hospital for urological surgery and who signed away their right to dignity. [13] The team measured the penises of 144 men admitted to hospital for urological surgery, using a ''rigid ruler''. [8]

    How about that ;), i bet you guys will look at your hand after reading that



  2. #2

    much quicker to look at junk, LOL.

  3. #3

    So, wait...

    Doesn't that mean homosexuals have large penises?
    BlissfulDreams, Valdyr and pretty.Odd thanked this post.

  4. #4

    *sniff, sniff*

    Smells like pseudoscience.

    Please cite a source for this article as well. As of right now, I'm calling bullshit.
    Snakecharmer and MiriMiriAru thanked this post.

  5. #5

    Men: Hold up your right hand. Are your index and ring fingers close to the same size?
    *nods*

    Congratulations, you're more likely than men with mismatched digits to have a long penis!
    *eyes light up*

    *looks down*

    *sighs*
    Mutatio NOmenis, Nomenclature, Rhee and 1 others thanked this post.

  6. #6

    I'm pretty sure the only way to know a man's penis size is to pull down his pants and find out.
    Mutatio NOmenis, Neon Knight, viva and 6 others thanked this post.

  7. #7

    Quote Originally Posted by Eerie View Post
    I'm pretty sure the only way to know a man's penis size is to pull down his pants and find out.
    Not even, in some cases :) (hooray for speedos!)
    Mutatio NOmenis and nevermore thanked this post.

  8. #8

    This is pretty old science. I remember seeing it some years back, sorry.

  9. #9

    Quote Originally Posted by Paragon View Post
    *sniff, sniff*

    Smells like pseudoscience.

    Please cite a source for this article as well. As of right now, I'm calling bullshit.
    Or maybe you just don't want to look at your hand ;)

    http://http://newsfeedresearcher.com...ths-ratio.html

  10. #10

    @Paragon, I went through Nature's site to get it for you, the Asian Journal of Andrology is peer reviewed and supported by various research institutions.

    To be honest, I was skeptical too. I spent the last few hours reading up on with PubMed and apparently the 2D:4D thing is a fairly common indicator in research studies in endocrinology and andrology and even pathology. I had no idea -- I knew about the importance of neonatal testosterone and the recent studies on that, and that supposedly there were some physiological indicators, but nothing to this degree.

    Upon further study, I found out that studies in the past year focusing on this finger ratio are common, especially for men. This includes topics such as facial symmetry (although not masculinity), neonatal testosterone and circular testosterone levels. These topics have been assosiated with such fields of research as homosexuality in men, so it was interesting to see it brought up in the article.

    This is not the only topic which has finger ratios (alcohol dependency and oral cancer research both also discuss this as well, for example) but there is a definite trend in the papers I was reading on the PubMed website relating to this topic -- you can see some of them in the cite list above. I am not entirely sure what my opinion is yet, but I will share what I have read. It is worth keeping in mind that with the media now focusing on it there is likely to be some explanations or counter positions appearing in the expert community so it might be worth keeping an eye out for that.
    Promethea, 007phantom, Valdyr and 3 others thanked this post.


 

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