Why is my coffee bitter?

Why is my coffee bitter?

Hello Guest! Sign up to join the discussion below...
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 20
Thank Tree30Thanks

This is a discussion on Why is my coffee bitter? within the Critical Thinking & Philosophy forums, part of the Topics of Interest category; OK. Here's my problem. I'm drinking coffee. I have a true belief that the coffee tastes bitter. Now, the question ...

  1. #1

    Why is my coffee bitter?

    OK. Here's my problem.

    I'm drinking coffee. I have a true belief that the coffee tastes bitter. Now, the question is, is the true belief justified because I have evidence that the coffee tastes bitter or is the true belief justified because my sense of taste and the cognitive processes that recognize a taste as bitter are reliable? Why?
    Valdyr, MirrorSmile and EclecticTraveler thanked this post.



  2. #2

    The coffee itself is not bitter. It's just the way our taste buds and brain are configured. Who's to say that coffee couldn't taste sweet or sour to some alien species or something?
    Psychosmurf, Fizz, MirrorSmile and 3 others thanked this post.

  3. #3

    The true belief is that the coffee tastes bitter not that the coffee itself is bitter.

  4. #4

    Quote Originally Posted by Psychosmurf View Post
    The true belief is that the coffee tastes bitter not that the coffee itself is bitter.
    But how do we define a true belief? Does it have to be true for everyone? DUN DUN DUN!!!

    Nah, I'm not going there. I suppose both can be correct. The sense of taste and the cognitive processes that tell you the coffee is bitter are your evidence.
    Psychosmurf thanked this post.

  5. #5

    is it actually bitter or would you like to think that it is and thats what makes it bitter? We can put our minds to think of it as one way when it's quite the opposite.
    Psychosmurf and Angelic Gardevoir thanked this post.

  6. #6

    It is a true belief that the coffee tastes bitter. Why is it true? I'm not going there either. (Not yet anyway) The question is what justifies the true belief? The idea that we have evidence for the true belief, or that the true belief arises from reliable cognitive processes?

  7. #7

    Quote Originally Posted by Psychosmurf View Post
    It is a true belief that the coffee tastes bitter. Why is it true? I'm not going there either. (Not yet anyway) The question is what justifies the true belief? The idea that we have evidence for the true belief, or that the true belief arises from reliable cognitive processes?
    Quote Originally Posted by Angelic Gardevoir View Post
    I suppose both can be correct. The sense of taste and the cognitive processes that tell you the coffee is bitter are your evidence.
    I was referring to both of the possibilities you brought up. It is justified because you have evidence that was gathered through reliable (well, we'll assume that they are) cognitive processes. I combined the two.
    Psychosmurf thanked this post.

  8. #8

    I also think it is possible that both could justify the true belief. However, if both methods justify true beliefs to the same degree, then there should be no cases in which they disagree on the justification of a true belief. But such cases do exist.

    Consider the case of Psychosmurf and Psychosmurf*. They're both really the same person in two very different situations. Let's assume that Psychosmurf is just a normal guy and has perfectly ordinary experiences. Let's also say that a mad scientist abducted Psychosmurf*, took out his brain, and hooked it up to a computer that simulates perfectly ordinary experiences similar to those of Psychosmurf. Now let's see what happens when Psychosmurf and Psychosmurf* drink coffee. Let us say that they both have a true belief that the coffee they are drinking tastes bitter. Now, if the first view is true, i.e. that the coffee is bitter because we possess evidence, then Psychosmurf*'s true belief that the coffee is sweet is just as justified as Psychosmurf's belief that the coffee is sweet even though he is being radically deceived. (Because he possess evidence that the coffee is sweet by tasting it) If the other view is true, i.e. that a true belief is justified if it comes from reliable cognitive processes, then Psychosmurf*'s belief that the coffee is bitter is not justified, since all of his cognitive processes are completely unreliable. (Remember, the computer can feed him any information it wants) Psychosmurf's true belief that the coffee is bitter, on the other hand, is justified. Thus, in the case of Psychosmurf* the two views contradict each other, and both can't be true at the same time.
    Last edited by Psychosmurf; 11-18-2010 at 07:32 AM.
    Valdyr thanked this post.

  9. #9

    we're able to justify a belief since it all can be easily justified, which then gets me to question, what is true? and in this case, it comes down to people having to perceive it in different ways. So then it gets you to question 'why is the coffee bitter' with a various types of explanations.
    Psychosmurf and Angelic Gardevoir thanked this post.

  10. #10

    Quote Originally Posted by Psychosmurf View Post
    I also think it is possible that both could justify the true belief. However, if both methods justify true beliefs to the same degree, then there should be no cases in which they disagree on the justification of a true belief. But such cases do exist.

    Consider the case of Psychosmurf and Psychosmurf*. They're both really the same person in two very different situations. Let's assume that Psychosmurf is just a normal guy and has perfectly ordinary experiences. Let's also say that a mad scientist abducted Psychosmurf*, took out his brain, and hooked it up to a computer that simulates perfectly ordinary experiences similar to those of Psychosmurf. Now let's see what happens when Psychosmurf and Psychosmurf* drink coffee. Let us say that they both have a true belief that the coffee they are drinking tastes bitter. Now, if the first view is true, i.e. that the coffee is bitter because we possess evidence, then Psychosmurf*'s true belief that the coffee is sweet is just as justified as Psychosmurf's belief that the coffee is sweet even though he is being radically deceived. (Because he possess evidence that the coffee is sweet by tasting it) If the other view is true, i.e. that a true belief is justified if it comes from reliable cognitive processes, then Psychosmurf*'s belief that the coffee is bitter is not justified, since all of his cognitive processes are completely unreliable. (Remember, the computer can feed him any information it wants) Psychosmurf's true belief that the coffee is bitter, on the other hand, is justified. Thus, in the case of Psychosmuf* the two views contradict each other, and both can't be true at the same time.
    Well, you could also say that neither can justify the belief. However, our environment and our cognitive processes are all we have to go on. Thus, we assume all the time. We could be brains in jars, in a Matrix-like simulation, in a dream world, etc.
    Psychosmurf thanked this post.


 
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Making great coffee - thread for coffee lovers
    By Banjo in forum General Chat
    Replies: 26
    Last Post: 08-01-2013, 12:00 PM
  2. [ISTP] The bitter old man, just a few decades too early.
    By Erbse in forum ISTP Forum - The Mechanics
    Replies: 63
    Last Post: 06-22-2011, 12:11 PM
  3. Put on another pot of coffee...
    By Periwinkle in forum Intro
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 03-02-2010, 05:45 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
All times are GMT -7. The time now is 04:01 AM.
Information provided on the site is meant to complement and not replace any advice or information from a health professional.
2014 PersonalityCafe