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Social media, the internet, and hyperreality

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This is a discussion on Social media, the internet, and hyperreality within the Critical Thinking & Philosophy forums, part of the Topics of Interest category; Originally Posted by nonnaci While I agree that the attention economy has a sycophant component, I think the underlying relation ...

  1. #21

    Quote Originally Posted by nonnaci View Post
    While I agree that the attention economy has a sycophant component, I think the underlying relation is still monetary. i.e. high view/like/subscriber counts translates into advertising bidding wars and higher conversion rates which generates sustainable revenue to afford a particular life style. I suppose these social media platforms democratize the cult of celebrity of traditional media outlets but the problem still stands, must one present a hyperreal image of oneself in order to achieve success in the social-media sphere? And conversely on the demand side of the equation, has the perception of life by the clicker/viewers/subscribers been made more mundane by mere exposure to hyperreal images? i.e. a vampiric aura effect of sorts?
    I agree with this, I didnt mean to make it sound like some illuminati plot. I think its a product of circumstance mostly but also a product of people underestimating the mass hypnotic effect it has by tapping into the endocrine reward system. In my last job I had coworkers who could not go a couple of hours without checking into their social media accounts. It became a massive source of friction for me actually. I couldnt get people to pay attention to their actual jobs the way they were supposed to. In an office environment this may appear less prevalent just because working ones phone is more acceptable in that context, but it became horribly apparent and distracting in my line of work.

    The staged lifestyles of IG for example are extremely poor reflections of reality. In fact many of these accounts are especiallu repetitive in the exact type and style of photographs and blurbs they have with them. Its almost become a formula, so many selfies, interspersed with x number of lifestyle shots and y number of inspirational quotes. Even the messages in the blurbs are entirely unoriginal. It shocks me how people can fall in like with these 'personalities' when all they are is a series of headshots and platitudes. Many of them unoriginally and blatantly plugging products. Its as if nuanced advertising is no longer necessary because people will suck up literally anything these days and defend the person doing it.
    Last edited by EndsOfTheEarth; 12-30-2016 at 07:50 PM.
    Roland Khan and nonnaci thanked this post.

  2. #22

    Was just thinking recently about end of Rick Roderick's lecture series of self under siege where he says:
    308 Baudrillard: Fatal Strategies (1993) - Rick Roderick
    Well, this calls for Fatal Strategies according to Baudrillard, we have to adopt fatal strategies here; fatal strategies, extremes. We have to learn to live with complexity, uncertainty and a certain amount of vertigo. We just have to do that, we don’t have any choice. I mean, we only have the dinosaur choice. That’s when you just wander off into the ice caps and sort of fall away.

    And I also think that we have to be wary of the overquick reduction of complexity. If some of this lecture has seemed a little weird or to go a little too far, it’s because I don’t want to reduce quite all of this to slogans. On the other hand I don’t want it to not be funny because part of the postmodern trajectory itself is a rather humorous joke on the human race which laboured for millennia to reduce working hours in order to produce leisure so we could enjoy this very leisure that then turns in a kind of vengeful act against us absorbing our leisure time which was to be our living time into time now spent in the service of what can only be called this inhuman spectacle. I mean, it’s a very bizarre and twisted fate to which postmodernity has led us. So I would be wary of simple answers to this.
    ...
    Well I don’t know how much further we can go down this road but in any case the road according to Baudrillard is an endless set of what will be Fatal Strategies – to use his new title – and all we can do is wait and see what will happen. If nothing does, in the sense of the real, Baudrillard will have a kind of confirmation. It’s my hope that he will be disconfirmed on the simple grounds that wherever we find power – even the power of the hyperreal – we find counter-power, and where we see an image that reproduces us as inhuman, occasionally we see an image that somehow has the bizarre transcendent power to make us slightly more human again, but it’s along that terrain I think that the battles and the struggles the self will fight with itself will be fought in the future. Thank you very much [applause].
    And my thought is that if simplicity isn't necessarily the solution because it doesn't address/resolve complexity as much as it simply tries to ignore it, and we have to perhaps accept that complexity is just a part of the way of life now. Whether there is some synthesis of the two which transcends it, and that this might be an expression of a possible avenue that Rick Roderick's term counter power could apply. And through it we can find our human selves again.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metamodernism
    http://metamoderna.org/5-things-that...modern?lang=en
     
    Might help discuss and frame what is meant by metamodernism


    Though this probably doesn't transcend it as much as it reflects the tension between a modernist society with an emergent postmodernism.
    When I talked about the postmodern in the way Baudrillard does as a trajectory, I see it as an emergent aspect of our culture. Our culture is still dominantly modernist, rationalised, capitalist and so on. And to even make things more complex thirdly there are residual elements in our culture, left over from earlier periods. For example patriarchy, left over from a past as ancient perhaps as the species.
    Last edited by Wellsy; 01-08-2017 at 09:38 AM.

  3. #23

    I'm glad to be in generation Y. Got a glimpse of reality and social media shit.

  4. #24

    Quote Originally Posted by Wellsy View Post
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metamodernism
    5 things that make you metamodern | Metamoderna
     
    Might help discuss and frame what is meant by metamodernism


    Though this probably doesn't transcend it as much as it reflects the tension between a modernist society with an emergent postmodernism.
    Interesting concept. Incidentally, I see this played out in some animes such as Monogatari series and the shorts from Japan's animator expo where the absurd engenders the authentic.
    Wellsy thanked this post.

  5. #25

    Quote Originally Posted by Wellsy View Post
    Was just thinking recently about end of Rick Roderick's lecture series of self under siege where he says:
    308 Baudrillard: Fatal Strategies (1993) - Rick Roderick


    And my thought is that if simplicity isn't necessarily the solution because it doesn't address/resolve complexity as much as it simply tries to ignore it, and we have to perhaps accept that complexity is just a part of the way of life now. Whether there is some synthesis of the two which transcends it, and that this might be an expression of a possible avenue that Rick Roderick's term counter power could apply. And through it we can find our human selves again.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metamodernism
    5 things that make you metamodern | Metamoderna
     
    Might help discuss and frame what is meant by metamodernism


    Though this probably doesn't transcend it as much as it reflects the tension between a modernist society with an emergent postmodernism.
    I went to a symposium on metamodernism, almost 2 and a half years ago already: metamodernism - the return of history - Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam

    If you're interested, I wrote my notes down here: research project myth and postmodernism: End of History vs Neverending Story

    Personally I think it makes sense, that we're leaving the postmodern perspective behind towards more engagement. I like how they call metamodernism an oscillation (swinging) between the postmodern and the modern.
    nonnaci and Wellsy thanked this post.

  6. #26

    Thank you for sharing ^_^
    Quote Originally Posted by babblingbrook View Post
    I went to a symposium on metamodernism, almost 2 and a half years ago already: metamodernism - the return of history - Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam

    If you're interested, I wrote my notes down here: research project myth and postmodernism: End of History vs Neverending Story

    Personally I think it makes sense, that we're leaving the postmodern perspective behind towards more engagement. I like how they call metamodernism an oscillation (swinging) between the postmodern and the modern.
    This really stood out to me as suggesting how without some threat to capitalism, and with the immersive technologies for mass communication that "kills the urge to interpret".
    Fukuyama’s proclamation of the “End of History” and the many notions that emerged in close relation to this moment – the end of ideology, the end of the grand narratives, the end of Art, the end of the subject, of the real, of truth – are often associated with postmodernism. Now that History has returned and many of the postmodern discourses on society, culture, and the arts feel increasingly outdated, cultural theorists Timotheus Vermeulen (assistent-professor Radboud University Nijmegen) and Robin van den Akker (Lecturer Cultural Studies and Theory at Erasmus University College Rotterdam) have proposed abandoning this term for another: metamodernism. In light of recent socio-economic changes and contemporary forms of artistic production – such as the New Engagement in the arts and the New Aesthetic in design, the New Sincerity in literature and the New Weird in music, Quirky Cinema and Quality Television – they theorize metamodernism as a structure of feeling that emerged around the turn of the millennium. For them, the 2000s – seen as a historical period rather than a temporal decade (and ranging from the late 1990s to 2011) – served as a passage from late capitalism to a fourth and global stage of capitalism and from a postmodern cultural logic to a metamodern one.
    201 Nietzsche as Myth and Mythmaker (1991) - Rick Roderick
    So there are stakes to interpretation. So as we discuss this throughout the course, please don’t think this is some airy, stupid, academic dispute. In fact I would argue that the last ten years of political life have been about the attempt to kill the very desire to interpret. In a certain way… there has been a certain social trajectory which the text of Nietzsche addresses, that involve accepting surfaces and to kill the urge to interpret in anything but the most superficial way. And that will be part of the social and political aspect of the argument I will develop, okay.
    Which I relate to Roderick's point about postmodernism moving the conscious into the unconscious.
    108 Philosophy and Post-Modern Culture (1990) - Rick Roderick
    Freud compares the conscious mind, in the book I have – I am talking about now – he compares the conscious mind to a garrison. A captured, tiny garrison in an immense city, the city of Rome; with all its layers of history, all its archaic barbarisms, all its hidden avenues, covered over by civilization after civilization. That’s our mind, that whole thing. But the conscious part of it is that one garrison that’s clear, that holds out in this captured city. A magnificent metaphor for all the surrounding motives, motivations, motifs, desires, that drive us… that are not philosophical… that cannot, even if we talk to our therapist a long time, all be brought up at once.
    ...
    So the goal of analytic treatment would be for those unreflected massive areas – again to go back to that metaphor of the city – to become part of the garrison as it spreads out to things we are clear about. In other words, it’s not a bad metaphor saying we shouldn’t be clear about who we are, and have an “I”, or a self, or a subject. Now, why am I bringing this up now? Well, to contrast it with my last remarks about culture, if the goal of psychoanalysis is that the unreflected parts become reflected, that the “it” become the “I”, then the goal of a mass simulational culture – and this is a remark that I am using from the Frankfurt school, don’t worry about it.

    The goal of a mass telecommunication culture is psychoanalysis in reverse. It’s that the little, last remaining parts of that garrison become unconscious. It’s precisely to reverse that process of enlightenment. Mass culture is enlightenment in reverse gear. Precisely to wipe out that last little garrison of autonomy. It is a constant assault upon it…
    Which seems like it is captured in your blog post too, though I'm necessarily interpreting them in relation to one another and assuming that they speak towards the same thing.
    There was an endless repetition of 9/11 on our television screens. The images were and are repeated endlessly and ingrained into our brains and collective understanding. We could say that this repetition of (mass) media itself is in a loop. There is no beginning or end to the narrative. It's mostly repetition. Media is one of the causes of an end of history. There are no ends to myths itself either; they are circular in time. Eliade suggests that the abandonment of mythical thought and the full acceptance of linear, historical time, with its "terror", is one of the reasons for modern man's anxieties.
    Since it's speaking of the End of History it also makes me think about what time is or how we have an intuitive experience of time based on how things change, that we measure cycles like the rise of the sun the rotation of the earth around the sun and such to measure time, but it doesn't really measure a clear entity but is an analog for it. That if there was no cycle but simply repetition, I assume the impression of time would be lost. A bit like what I've experienced when driving down a long straight road where it feels as if i'm not moving anywhere because there's no contrast/difference to discern that I am in fact moving rather than stuck on treadmill.
    That without any aspiration to a future, that its as if history ended and we're on a treadmill where things aren't going to change. And what more perfect an outlook for those that defend the status quo as the epitome of human history. But Fukuyama makes use of a vulgar sense of what Marxists would treat as the end of history, that of communism where class struggle is resolved and people are more self-aware of themselves within reality and thus more active rather than passive unconscious in the modern/postmodern world.
    Fukuyama tried to ignore the class struggle that creates friction between many people in his assertion, and while I don't think any global socialist revolution is on the horizon, it certainly isn't entirely unlikely for the future should our society endure the crisis we are told we face (global warming, mass immigration upon world disasters natural or otherwise).
    That it feels like an end of history to many because without the threat of an alternative future, one we conceive differently to the capitalism we endure, which is difficult whilst living within capitalist world, There Is No Alternative (TINA).

    I suppose metamodernism does a nice job in accepting the cynicism of postmodernism that we can't create some abstract perspective that accounts for everything. But postmodernism goes to far with rejecting everything and asserting no objective truth and instead intersubjectivities that makes everyones perspective equally valid.
    I'm wondering whether that is a tension, that we as subjects can't have an objective view point (God's eye) and so our best attempt to penetrate reality and truth relies on attempting to synthesize the different abstracted perspectives. Which is what I tend to imagine the dialectic does, emphasizing the relationship between things, making one focus on things that seem that they would destroy one another as opposites according to Aristotelian logic but not in the organic Hegelian logic.
    Last edited by Wellsy; 01-10-2017 at 05:38 PM.
    nonnaci thanked this post.

  7. #27

    @nonnaci

    I would like to recommend a text from a rather observant French thinker, Jacques Ellul which I think does well to explore the sort of chaotic flurry we find ourselves in with the speed of technological communications.

    Full Text - Propaganda: the formation of men's attitudes by Jacques Ellul
    Short excerpt from the book to give a taste: http://www.edgeofgrace.net/2006/11/1...on-propaganda/
    nonnaci thanked this post.

  8. #28

    The more false selves you create that idealize the ego self the further away from the true Self you are. The more time you spend acting from an illusory sense of self and reality the stronger the ego becomes and the harder it is to find the true Self.
    strawberryLola thanked this post.

  9. #29

    Quote Originally Posted by nonnaci View Post
    I found an interesting postmodern concept on Hyperreality or the simulation of reality as being "more real" than reality. The early signs began with the cinema, television and media which over the years has over the years conditioned everyone to the image of a graphic and sensationalized version of the world than what it is. Now with the web 2.0 social and mobile revolution widespread, how has your concept of social relationships changed? Social networks seem to make identity construction very easy so one can imagine how a friend/acquaintance you know in person can take on a whole different persona online. Which one is more real in your mind or has the lines blurred to the point of making the distinction irrelevant?
    What's the difference? People can have different personas at work, when meeting different people, when in different moods, etc. what difference does internet make?

  10. #30

    Quote Originally Posted by Arzazar Szubrasznikarazar View Post
    What's the difference? People can have different personas at work, when meeting different people, when in different moods, etc. what difference does internet make?
    As a medium, the internet creates a rapid feedback loop of the images that you present of yourself with the reactions of a wide audience. Things that get voted up / liked / thanked more tends to overlap with lowest denominator factors (e.g. clickbaity quotes, boobs, spectacles, anything on instagram). Moreover, they become indicators of human attention (a scarce resource competed for by all those who partake in internet schemes) which then gets comodified by the advertising sector. Thus a circuit forms when you are monetarily rewarded for presenting more and more hyperreal versions of the thing that got you attention in the first place. The end result is that your livelihood becomes contingent on an illusion which is dehumanizing.


     
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