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The Dynamics of Cognitive Functions

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This is a discussion on The Dynamics of Cognitive Functions within the Articles forums, part of the Announcements category; Originally Posted by SyndiCat "Before we take a look at Ni-Fe, we should first take a look at Pi-Je." Most ...

  1. #11

    Quote Originally Posted by SyndiCat View Post
    "Before we take a look at Ni-Fe, we should first take a look at Pi-Je."

    Most people are thrown into complicated explanations on what our functions might do, yet have little understanding of why and how they actually do it, so they ultimately create their own explanations like e.g. Sensors are great soccer players, Thinkers are logical, and Feelers are emotional. I have done it, I am sure, and I still do. They think Ni does this, Ne does that, Fi does this, and Fe does that, but they have yet to learn the complexity of how e.g. Ji work in dominant, auxiliary, tertiary and inferior form along with Je, Pi and Pe.

    Someone presented a reasonable explanation on the anima and animus earlier in another section of the forum. I cannot remember who, however, in his explanation he displayed an image where the top two functions worked as our Hero, our next two worked as our Child, or Parent, I cannot exactly remember their names, and then there were our Mirror functions (Shadows). So I believe various explanations can be given to understand the same concept, but one should take into consideration how easy it is to misrepresent and most importantly misinterpret these different models.

    After all, people are still using Kiersey to explain behavior in type. Which means I'm an INFJ when I'm with people, and an ESTP when I'm home alone (Can also be explained through anima and animus).

    Optimality theory sounds interesting though. Layers in speech and recognition that is.
    As for the image of the anima and animus, I think it was a post by @Eric B in this thread: second to last post.

    I have to admit that I've been pretty lost at times as to how these things work and fit together, since the real world is full of so many possibilities that happen all at the same time. And then I try to remember that theories or models are just lenses that we use to view the world in a certain categorization structure so that we can come to a focused understanding about certain specific phenomena. Within language study, we could view something through a Cognitive lens and get a certain interpretation from data, or we could view it through a Sociocultural lens and get entirely different interpretations using the same data. Optimality Theory is just another one of these lenses, and to be honest I'm not quite certain (in fact highly doubtful) of its applicability to spheres other than language. So, I guess you're saying we need to be careful to choose the appropriate lens to get the focus that we need for what we're looking at, perhaps?

    I also have to admit that I haven't heard much about Ji, Je, Pi, and Pe either. I suppose I should look more into that.

    Without lenses of theory, I've always tended to think of personality as a sort of three-dimensional dynamic continuum spectrum thing, complete with various shades of colours. And I've always thought that every person had every shade and colour as a possibility. It's just that people tended to have a general 'comfort zone' of where they tended to stay. Sometimes they could edge closer to the edge of that zone, and sometimes even move out of that zone.

    However, without using the appropriate theoretical lenses, it's easy to get lost and off down the wrong path. It was something that I had done, and probably will do again. The great thing about being mistaken, though, is that perhaps you can better understand things, I think.
    SyndiCat thanked this post.

  2. #12

    Thanks Syndicat. In layman terms, it is what Jung called compensatory function theory. Naomi Quenck made notable reference to this theory in her books. However Dario Nardi along with Lenore Thomson does not see the compensatory functions (Te-Fi, Fe-Ti, Se-Ni, Ne-Si and vice-versa) as opposing one another. They claim these functions work in tandem as described here. Notwithstanding I am glad that someone has caught on to the fact that the dominant and inferior functions are not direct opposites.
    Aßbiscuits, erasinglines and SyndiCat thanked this post.

  3. #13

    Quote Originally Posted by Nitou View Post
    This idea resonates with my own observations. Fi is my demon. I have little use for its values. Nevertheless it does comes hopping out in a fury sometimes, making fast but immature moral judgments and making me feel a bit silly afterward. That would prompt the stronger functions to take over, working in relay: Ne to consider that I'm not seeing the whole picture, Si to consider the personal relevance of the event, Fe to consider social values and most importantly Ti to fit them all together in a reasoned rather than emotional judgment. Ti-Fe does emulate Fi; it is a slower but far more reliable means of making value judgments (for me).
    WOAH... that explained how it works for me so perfectly! Thanks =]

  4. #14

    @SyndiCat why does my cognitive function test change every time I take it? It seems to change drastically

  5. #15

    Quote Originally Posted by Heather White Karnas View Post
    @SyndiCat why does my cognitive function test change every time I take it? It seems to change drastically
    Because what you prefer to remember will influence your test.

    I'll assume you've heard the metaphor "Life's a Roller Coaster - Life consists of ups and downs, and we are along for the ride." Your cognitive preferences will be in constant motion depending on where you are at in your life. Let's say you go through a breakup with your significant other. If you go through something like that then it is most likely to cause you pain through memories you prefer not to have or focus on, and in return it will result in you preferring cognitive functions you are most comfortable with. In this case, introverts may begin to preference their introverted functions, whereas extraverts may begin to preference their extraverted functions. And let's say you've found some form of enlightenment, or hope, or strength, to carry on as if nothing bad has ever happened to you, and you can only see the joys in life-- it may result in you dissolving into your element-- that is, balance out your cognitive preferences.

    Regarding Cognitive Function tests. You cannot limit an Se question to people who only use Se. If that was possible, then saying "White men can't jump" is absolutely correct and we should proceed with categorizing individual abilities by the color of their skin. When you look at an Se question, you will be able to interpret it just like everyone else can, and you will answer it to the best of your knowledge. Your knowledge is influenced by what you remember, and more importantly what you prefer to remember.
    Heather White Karnas thanked this post.

  6. #16

    Quote Originally Posted by Heather White Karnas View Post
    @SyndiCat why does my cognitive function test change every time I take it? It seems to change drastically
    This is indicative of what I have been saying about the test. Our functions are fluid and dynamic, not rigid and static like dichotomies (E-I, S-N, T-F,-J-P). The test indicates functions you are currently using most for circumstances you are facing. Therefore you should not determine your type from the test and the results will never be consistent.

  7. #17

    Quote Originally Posted by Functianalyst View Post
    This is indicative of what I have been saying about the test. Our functions are fluid and dynamic, not rigid and static like dichotomies (E-I, S-N, T-F,-J-P). The test indicates functions you are currently using most for circumstances you are facing. Therefore you should not determine your type from the test and the results will never be consistent.
    on 4/10/11 here are my results: Ne - Fi - Fe - Se - Si - Ni - Ti - Te
    on 4/13/11 here are my results: Fe - Ni - Ne - Fi - Si - Se - Te - Ti
    on 4/15/11 here are my results: Ne - Ni - Fe - Fi - Ti - Se - Si - Te

    pretty inconsistent right?

  8. #18

    Quote Originally Posted by Functianalyst View Post
    This is indicative of what I have been saying about the test. Our functions are fluid and dynamic, not rigid and static like dichotomies (E-I, S-N, T-F,-J-P). The test indicates functions you are currently using most for circumstances you are facing. Therefore you should not determine your type from the test and the results will never be consistent.
    I would say it's because the test is measuring functions in terms of behaviors or "skills", and these change from time to time according to your experiences. That's the limitation of those tests. Your actual functional preferences aren't behaviors. Behaviors are just a possible clue.

  9. #19

    Quote Originally Posted by Heather White Karnas View Post
    on 4/10/11 here are my results: Ne - Fi - Fe - Se - Si - Ni - Ti - Te
    on 4/13/11 here are my results: Fe - Ni - Ne - Fi - Si - Se - Te - Ti
    on 4/15/11 here are my results: Ne - Ni - Fe - Fi - Ti - Se - Si - Te

    pretty inconsistent right?
    Exactly, the test results will always change because you or your circumstances are always changing.

  10. #20

    Quote Originally Posted by Eric B View Post
    I would say it's because the test is measuring functions in terms of behaviors or "skills", and these change from time to time according to your experiences. That's the limitation of those tests. Your actual functional preferences aren't behaviors. Behaviors are just a possible clue.
    ....Or is the person taking the assessment based on their behavior or skills, which changes or modifies as we grow? The test (at least the good ones) instruct you to take the test as you are always, not based on how you see yourself, how others see you, or how you would like to be seen. The test(s) generally do what they're made to do, it's us that changes.


 
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