Enneagram Type Synopses and Foci of Attention

Enneagram Type Synopses and Foci of Attention

Hello Guest! Sign up to join the discussion below...
Page 1 of 5 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 42
Thank Tree116Thanks

This is a discussion on Enneagram Type Synopses and Foci of Attention within the Articles forums, part of the Announcements category; Hello all! I found an good synopsis of the various enneagram types that digs a bit deeper than usual summaries, ...

  1. #1

    Enneagram Type Synopses and Foci of Attention

    Hello all! I found an good synopsis of the various enneagram types that digs a bit deeper than usual summaries, in my opinion. It brings up some very important points that can help us become more self-aware and aware of those around us. I hope you find them as interesting as I did!


    One: The Perfectionist
    Earning love by being perfect. Worrying about getting it right. Measuring up to the highest standards. Finding an ethical platform on which to build your life. Thinking centers on should, must, and ought to. We should have a faultless relationship. We must have a spotless record at work. At its best, the commitment to goodness serves as a humane guide to improvement. In self-defense, Ones often feel morally superior by finding fault with others.

    Focus of Attention
    • Searching for perfection. Avoiding error and evil.
    • Conscientious. High moral character.
    • Think right. Should, must, and ought to.
    • Do right. Emphasize the practical virtues: work, thrift, honesty, and effort.
    • Be right. Severe internal critic. An internal judging voice.
    • Compulsive work load can block out unacceptable feelings
    • Anger caused by unmet needs. Self-denial generates resentment. Not aware of own anger (“I’m just energetic today”).
    • Worry in decision making. Afraid to make a mistake.
    • This focus of attention ensures an ethical and moral life. It can also lead to:
      One-right-way thinking: right or wrong, black or white. No grays.
      Superb powers of criticism. An intuitive sense of how perfect things could be.


    Two: The Giver
    Ensuring love by being helpful. Managing other people’s lives. Supporting and pleasing intimates. The power behind the throne at work. Different aspects of self emerge to meet the needs of others. A self for the team, a self for the boss, many selves for private life. At its best, this giving is altruistic and generous. As a defensive gesture, giving is geared to getting something in return.

    Focus of Attention
    • Gaining approval. Adapting to please others. Avoiding own needs.
    • Pride in being needed. Being central in people’s lives. Being indispensable.
    • A sense of having many different selves to meet the needs of others.
    • Confusion arises between the different selves. “Which one is really me?”
    • Hard to recognize own needs. Needs are met by helping other people.
    • Wanting freedom. Feeling confined by support given to others.
    • Self-presentation alters to meet the needs of others. This way of paying attention can lead to:
      Empathic emotional connections or:
      Adaptation to the wishes of others as a way of gaining or retaining their love.


    Three: The Performer
    Winning love through achievement and image. Doing things with the family. High-powered and high-profile at work. Sensitive to status. Wanting to be first, to lead, to be seen. Emanating an impressive facade. Work is the area of interest; feelings are suspended while the job gets done. At its best, the performance orientation produces effective leadership. As a means of defense, image is tailored to bolster personal success.

    Focus of Attention
    • Achievement, productiveness, and performance. Goals, tasks, and results.
    • Competition and efficiency. Avoiding failure.
    • Poor access to emotional life. Heart is in work.
    • Convergent thinking. A multitrack mind focused on a single product or goal.
    • “I am what I do.” Confusion between the real self and one’s job or role.
    • Learning to “do” feelings. Doing the look and learning the lines.
    • Chameleon. Changing roles and changing image.
    • This way of paying attention can maximize success. It also leads to:
      Self-deception. Beginning to believe the public image.


    Four: The Romantic
    Longing for love at a distance, feeling disappointed when love is near at hand. We used to be connected, now it doesn’t feel right. We had it once. Where did it go? Lifelong searching for heart connection; attraction, hate, high drama, pain. Elegant lifestyles, unique presentation, a distinctive career, creative business views. At its best, the passionate quest leads to depth of feeling. As a posture, dramatic moods make Fours too precious for ordinary life.

    Focus of Attention
    • Wanting what is unavailable, far away, and hard to get. Avoiding the ordinary.
    • Mood, manners, luxury, and good taste hedge low self-esteem.
    • Attracted to the mood of melancholy. The flavor of longing.
    • Disdaining ordinary life, the “flatness of ordinary feelings.”
    • Amping up ordinary life through loss, fantasy, artistic connection, and dramatic acts. Drama kings and queens.
    • Push-pull relationships. Wanting the best of what is missing. Pushing it away when it’s available again. This alternating focus reinforces:
      Feelings of abandonment and loss, but also lends itself to:
      Emotional sensitivity and depth. An ability to support others during pain and crisis.


    Five: The Observer
    Detached from love and charged emotion. Needing privacy to discover what they feel. Separated from people in public, feeling more emotional when they’re by themselves. Fives like protected work environments, no interruptions, limited windows of contact, and agendas announced in advance. At its best, the detached stance produces reliable, clear-minded analysis. As a psychological strategy, detachment minimizes contact.

    Focus of Attention
    • Preoccupied with privacy and noninvolvement.
    • Storing knowledge and the essentials of survival. Avoiding emptiness.
    • Tightening the belt to maintain independence. Making do with less.
    • Valuing emotional control. Preferring structured events, known agenda and time.
    • Compartments. Keeping the departments of life separate from each other. Predetermined time slots for emotionally charged events.
    • The power of knowing. Analytic systems and special information. Wanting the keys to the way the world works. Figuring out feelings.
    • Confusing spiritual nonattachment with the need to detach from emotional pain.
    • Watching life from the point of view of an outside observer. This way of paying attention can lead to:
      Feeling isolated from the events of one’s own life or an ability to:
      Assume a detached point of view that is unaffected by fear or desire.


    Six: The Trooper
    Questioning love and a rosy future. Afraid to believe and be betrayed. Do you still want me? Will my work flourish? Is this certain? Should I doubt? Loyal in love, Troopers turn to their intimates for reassurance. Mistrusting authority, they ask hard questions at work. Well used, a questioning mind produces clarity of purpose. As a life stance, inner doubt interferes with progress.

    Focus of Attention
    • Procrastinating. Thinking replaces doing. Avoiding action.
    • High goals, often with a history of incompletion.
    • Anxiety peaks with success. Success equals exposure to hostile forces.
    • Amnesia about success and pleasure.
    • Authority problems. Either submitting to or rebelling against authority.
    • Suspecting other people’s motives, especially authorities’.
    • Identifying with underdog causes. Leading the opposition party.
    • Afraid to recognize own anger. Afraid of other people’s anger.
    • Skepticism and doubt. Buddhist “doubting mind.”
    • A mental “Yes, but…”or “This may not work.”
    • Scanning the environment for clues to explain the inner sense of threat.
    • This way of paying attention will confirm that:
      The world is a threatening place, but also leads to:
      Recognizing the motives and hidden agendas that influence relating.


    Seven: The Epicure
    Entitled to love and to be well regarded. Expecting projects to come out right. Love and work should be adventures. Wanting to lead a fabulous life. The best part of love is initial attraction. The best part of work is a brilliant idea. Brainstorming, planning, opening options. A positive future, an exciting career. At its best, the adventurous approach conveys its enthusiasm to others. As a self-serving tactic, the attraction to pleasure is a way to escape from pain.

    Focus of Attention
    • Stimulation. New and interesting things to do. Wanting to stay high. Avoiding pain.
    • Maintaining multiple options. Hedging commitment to a single course of action. Fearing limitation.
    • Replacing deep or painful feelings with a pleasant alternative. Escaping to mental pleasure. Talking, planning, and intellectualizing.
    • Charm as a first line of defense. Fearing types who move forward into friendly contact with people. Avoiding conflict by going through the cracks. Talking one’s way out of trouble.
    • A way of paying attention that relates and systematizes information so that commitments come with loopholes and options. This style of attention can lead to:
      Rationalized escapism from a difficult or limiting commitment or:
      The ability to find connections, parallels, and unusual fits. A talent for nonlinear synthesis of information.


    Eight: The Boss
    Expressing love through protection and power. Liking the truth that comes out in a fight. Pushing for contact. At ease with anger. Stand up for your people. Securing the bunker at work. Gravitating to positions of authority and control, Eights set the rules in love and business life. At its best, the take-charge stance develops leaders who use their power wisely. As a power stance, the best defense is a good offense.

    Focus of Attention
    • Controlling possessions and personal space.
    • Concerned about justice and power. Avoiding weakness.
    • Excessive self-presentation—too much, too loud, too many.
    • Impulse control. Needing to set limits.
    • Difficulty in recognizing dependency needs and softer emotions.
    • Boundary issues. Learning the difference between self-defense and aggression.
    • Denying other points of view in favor of the “truth.” Confusing objective truth with a subjective opinion that serves own agenda.
    • An “all-or-nothing” style of attention, which tends to see the extremes of a situation. People seem to be either fair or unfair, either warriors or wimps, with no middle ground. This style of attention can lead to:
      Unconsciously denying personal weakness or:
      Exercising appropriate force in the service of others.


    Nine: The Mediator
    Merging with loved ones, losing boundaries. Taking on their point of view. Becoming stubborn instead of getting angry. Sitting on the fence. “I didn’t say no, but I’m not sure I agree with you.” Nines can relate to all sides of an argument, which derails their own agenda. “Yes” means “Yes, I’m reflecting your opinion.” “Maybe” possibly could mean “No.” At its best, the merging habit offers genuine support. As a protective measure, adopting many points of view cushions commitment to any one of them.

    Focus of Attention
    • Replacing essential needs with unessential substitutes.
    • Comforting self with unessential pleasures. Avoiding conflict.
    • Ambivalence about personal decisions. “Do I agree or disagree?” Seeing all sides of the question. Decisions are easy when not personally loaded, for example, emergency actions or political opinions.
    • Postponing change by repeating familiar solutions. Acting through habit. Ritualism. There’s plenty of time. It can wait until tomorrow.
    • Hard to initiate change. Easier to know what you don’t want than what you do.
    • Can’t say no. Hard to separate. Hard to be the one to go.
    • Damping physical energy and anger. Diverting energy to trivia. Delayed reaction time for anger. Passive aggression. Anger equals separation.
    • Control by going stubborn. Do nothing. Wait it out. Control by using time. Wait some more.
    • Paying attention to other people’s agendas, which leads to:
      Difficulty in forming a personal position, but also develops:
      The ability to recognize and support what is essential to other people’s lives.


    Source: Palmer, Helen. The Enneagram in Love and Work: Understanding Your Intimate and Business Relationships (Kindle Locations 162-163). Harper Collins, Inc.. Kindle Edition.
    hornet, BlissfulDreams, lilgabiee and 68 others thanked this post.



  2. #2

    2's seem a lot more 3-ish in this description to me. The emphasis was more on adapting and social skills than giving and attaching. And 3's in this description seemed more 1-ish. :P Seemed more goal and work-oriented than most of the descriptions which seem more socially oriented.

    Really really really good types summary though. Simple and organized and understandable. I liked the explaining of the thought processes. (e.g Type 1, "I"m just energetic today.")
    MBTI Enthusiast, Beatrice and Ambivalent thanked this post.

  3. #3

    Seven: The Epicure
    Entitled to love and to be well regarded. Expecting projects to come out right. Love and work should be adventures. Wanting to lead a fabulous life. The best part of love is initial attraction. The best part of work is a brilliant idea. Brainstorming, planning, opening options. A positive future, an exciting career. At its best, the adventurous approach conveys its enthusiasm to others. As a self-serving tactic, the attraction to pleasure is a way to escape from pain.

    Focus of Attention

    • Stimulation. New and interesting things to do. Wanting to stay high. Avoiding pain.
    • Maintaining multiple options. Hedging commitment to a single course of action. Fearing limitation.
    • Replacing deep or painful feelings with a pleasant alternative. Escaping to mental pleasure. Talking, planning, and intellectualizing.
    • Charm as a first line of defense. Fearing types who move forward into friendly contact with people. Avoiding conflict by going through the cracks. Talking one’s way out of trouble.
    • A way of paying attention that relates and systematizes information so that commitments come with loopholes and options. This style of attention can lead to:
      Rationalized escapism from a difficult or limiting commitment or:
      The ability to find connections, parallels, and unusual fits. A talent for nonlinear synthesis of information.



      NO.
      & Maybe.
    Last edited by Choice; 12-02-2012 at 07:07 PM.
    Holunder, MBTI Enthusiast, Annietopia and 1 others thanked this post.

  4. #4

    The type seven description is not bad, but I'm convinced sevens feel less entitled to love and especially to being well regarded than others. They probably don't care much about the latter. And while they do tend to suppress bad feelings, there is no reason to suppress deep feelings. That sounds so much like the "sevens are shallow" clichee.
    MBTI Enthusiast, Annietopia, Choice and 3 others thanked this post.

  5. #5

    I don't know why I am still suprised how accurate is enneagram 4. It's always like 100% me :D
    MBTI Enthusiast thanked this post.

  6. #6

    Underlined what resonated.

    Eight: The Boss
    Expressing love through protection and power. Liking the truth that comes out in a fight. Pushing for contact. At ease with anger. Stand up for your people. Securing the bunker at work. Gravitating to positions of authority and control, Eights set the rules in love and business life. At its best, the take-charge stance develops leaders who use their power wisely. As a power stance, the best defense is a good offense.

    Focus of Attention
    • Controlling possessions and personal space.
    • Concerned about justice and power. Avoiding weakness.
    • Excessive self-presentation—too much, too loud, too many.
    • Impulse control. Needing to set limits.
    • Difficulty in recognizing dependency needs and softer emotions.
    • Boundary issues. Learning the difference between self-defense and aggression.
    • Denying other points of view in favor of the “truth.” Confusing objective truth with a subjective opinion that serves own agenda.
    • An “all-or-nothing” style of attention, which tends to see the extremes of a situation. People seem to be either fair or unfair, either warriors or wimps, with no middle ground. This style of attention can lead to:
      Unconsciously denying personal weakness or:
      Exercising appropriate force in the service of others.
    MBTI Enthusiast and Ambivalent thanked this post.

  7. #7

    I really enjoyed reading this. Thank you.
    MBTI Enthusiast thanked this post.

  8. #8

    Quote Originally Posted by MBTI Enthusiast View Post


    Six: The Trooper
    Questioning love and a rosy future. Afraid to believe and be betrayed. Do you still want me? Will my work flourish? Is this certain? Should I doubt? Loyal in love, Troopers turn to their intimates for reassurance. Mistrusting authority, they ask hard questions at work. Well used, a questioning mind produces clarity of purpose. As a life stance, inner doubt interferes with progress.

    Focus of Attention
    • Procrastinating. Thinking replaces doing. Avoiding action.
    • High goals, often with a history of incompletion.
    • Anxiety peaks with success. Success equals exposure to hostile forces.
    • Amnesia about success and pleasure. <--I love being successful, but I can forget about past successes if I have reason to worry. So this is kind of accurate.
    • Authority problems. Either submitting to or rebelling against authority. Usually not an issue if the authority figure isn't behaving like a jerk.
    • Suspecting other people’s motives, especially authorities’. I'm not generally suspicious of other people's motives; I usually just don't trust things to work out for me. The authority figure would have to be a jerk for me to get suspicious.
    • Identifying with underdog causes. Leading the opposition party.
    • Afraid to recognize own anger. Afraid of other people’s anger.
    • Skepticism and doubt. Buddhist “doubting mind.”
    • A mental “Yes, but…”or “This may not work.”
    • Scanning the environment for clues to explain the inner sense of threat.
    • This way of paying attention will confirm that:
      The world is a threatening place, but also leads to:
      Recognizing the motives and hidden agendas that influence relating.



    Source: Palmer, Helen. The Enneagram in Love and Work: Understanding Your Intimate and Business Relationships (Kindle Locations 162-163). Harper Collins, Inc.. Kindle Edition.
    This six description makes us sound like losers. I don't related to the following (in red).
    MBTI Enthusiast, Choice, Lurkosaurus and 1 others thanked this post.

  9. #9

    Six: The Trooper

    Procrastinating. Thinking replaces doing. Avoiding action. (this is likely my number one problem in life. Overthinking things i should just do)
    High goals, often with a history of incompletion.

    Anxiety peaks with success. Success equals exposure to hostile forces. ( i never have had success )
    Amnesia about success and pleasure.
    Authority problems. Either submitting to or rebelling against authority.
    Suspecting other people’s motives, especially authorities’.

    Identifying with underdog causes. Leading the opposition party.
    Afraid to recognize own anger. Afraid of other people’s anger.
    Skepticism and doubt. Buddhist “doubting mind.”
    A mental “Yes, but…”or “This may not work.”
    Scanning the environment for clues to explain the inner sense of threat.
    This way of paying attention will confirm that:
    The world is a threatening place, but also leads to:
    Recognizing the motives and hidden agendas that influence relating.


    i relate to all bolded. i must say i think this is a pretty good 6 description atleast for myself.
    MBTI Enthusiast, Ellis Bell and EremixS thanked this post.

  10. #10

    Yeah, I'm definitely a 6! Only thing I don't think totally relates is the bit about identifying with the underdog. And I'm not as fearful or anxious as the stereotype... :).
    Gildar thanked this post.


 
Page 1 of 5 123 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. [Enneagram Type 5] Dear [Enneagram Type], Sincerely [Enneagram Type]
    By Curiously in forum Type 5 Forum - The Investigator
    Replies: 438
    Last Post: 04-13-2014, 12:14 AM
  2. [Enneagram Type 6] Dear [Enneagram type], ... sincerely [Enneagram type]
    By Havok in forum Type 6 Forum - The Loyalist
    Replies: 28
    Last Post: 03-03-2014, 02:04 PM
  3. How Different Enneagram Types Pay Attention
    By cyamitide in forum Enneagram Personality Theory Forum
    Replies: 30
    Last Post: 03-30-2013, 09:53 PM
  4. [ENTJ] Ni and Your Life's Foci
    By Benja in forum ENTJ Forum - The Executives
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 08-02-2012, 06:52 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
All times are GMT -7. The time now is 12:13 PM.
Information provided on the site is meant to complement and not replace any advice or information from a health professional.
© 2014 PersonalityCafe